Correlating antibiotic use and criteria for defining infection in a rural nursing home

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149385
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlating antibiotic use and criteria for defining infection in a rural nursing home
Abstract:
Correlating antibiotic use and criteria for defining infection in a rural nursing home
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Beilke, Patricia
P.I. Institution Name:Immanuel Saint Joseph’s – Mayo Health System
Background/Objectives: Antibiotic resistance and appropriateness of their use in long term care (LTC) facilities has been recognized as problematic. This study looks at appropriateness of antibiotic/anti-infective use in a rural nursing home where nurses use defining criteria for infection as a tool prior to physician contacts. An underlying assumption of this study is nurses in LTC influence antibiotic use by when they choose to call physicians, and what they choose to tell physicians. The questions here included: were defining criteria for infection met when antibiotic/anti-infective drugs were used; were cultures or other supportive lab studies done when antibiotic/anti-infective drugs were prescribed; and were residents seen by a physician when antibiotic/anti-infective drugs were prescribed? Methods: This is a descriptive correlational study using a convenience sample of 68 incidents of antibiotic/anti-infective use in a small rural LTC facility. Results: Defining criteria for infection were present 92.6% of time. Pearson’s correlation demonstrated a significant positive relationship between lower respiratory infections and hospitalization. Lower respiratory tract was the most frequent infection site. Conclusion: Defining criteria for infection can help look at appropriateness of antibiotic use, but have not been thoroughly tested as a tool to judge appropriateness of antibiotic use.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelating antibiotic use and criteria for defining infection in a rural nursing homeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149385-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Correlating antibiotic use and criteria for defining infection in a rural nursing home</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Beilke, Patricia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Immanuel Saint Joseph&rsquo;s &ndash; Mayo Health System</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">beilke.patricia@mayo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background/Objectives: Antibiotic resistance and appropriateness of their use in long term care (LTC) facilities has been recognized as problematic. This study looks at appropriateness of antibiotic/anti-infective use in a rural nursing home where nurses use defining criteria for infection as a tool prior to physician contacts. An underlying assumption of this study is nurses in LTC influence antibiotic use by when they choose to call physicians, and what they choose to tell physicians. The questions here included: were defining criteria for infection met when antibiotic/anti-infective drugs were used; were cultures or other supportive lab studies done when antibiotic/anti-infective drugs were prescribed; and were residents seen by a physician when antibiotic/anti-infective drugs were prescribed? Methods: This is a descriptive correlational study using a convenience sample of 68 incidents of antibiotic/anti-infective use in a small rural LTC facility. Results: Defining criteria for infection were present 92.6% of time. Pearson&rsquo;s correlation demonstrated a significant positive relationship between lower respiratory infections and hospitalization. Lower respiratory tract was the most frequent infection site. Conclusion: Defining criteria for infection can help look at appropriateness of antibiotic use, but have not been thoroughly tested as a tool to judge appropriateness of antibiotic use.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:21Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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