Pitfalls of conducting research or implementing HIV prevention programs with adolescents at high risk for HIV infection

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149388
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pitfalls of conducting research or implementing HIV prevention programs with adolescents at high risk for HIV infection
Abstract:
Pitfalls of conducting research or implementing HIV prevention programs with adolescents at high risk for HIV infection
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Hartman, Sherry
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern Mississippi
Statistics have revealed that 60% to 80% of adolescents are sexually active by the age of 17. More recent literature indicates that many adolescents are waiting to have sex until “the right time.” When choosing the educational content or path, the professional is faced with an age-old ethical/moral debate of whether adults should provide risk-reduction intervention education versus provide abstinence-only messages, or even keep silent on the subject—a debate heralded by deeply-held emotions for educators, adolescents, and parents, no matter which path is chosen. The most critical question of concern is: Is the educator promoting or condoning sexual activity in adolescents if risk-reduction educational strategies, such as the use of condoms, are taught? Another question is: Is “just saying no” an acceptable solution when two loving, intimate adolescents are having a difficult time controlling their natural sexual urges? There are several psychosocial ramifications for adolescents undergoing HIV-related research. One ramification, in particular, may include emotional injury because of disclosure of information. A perceived fear or sense of threat of exposure may occur. Another ramification may occur after the nurse researcher has, for instance, administered HIV-related questionnaires that elicit information about sexuality, unprotected sex, and other sexual activity. The actual content on the questionnaire may provoke an injurious fear in the adolescent of already having had acquired HIV because of previous unprotected sexual activity. The purposes of this presentation are two-fold: (a) the researchers will relate their actual experiences of conducting research and implementing prevention educational programs with adolescents and (b) the researchers will provide theoretical and literature foundations for the ethical/moral issues of adolescents. Strategies will be offered that can be used by the nurse educator/research in order to reduce the chance of psychosocial injuries or ethical/moral dilemmas in adolescents and their families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePitfalls of conducting research or implementing HIV prevention programs with adolescents at high risk for HIV infectionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149388-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pitfalls of conducting research or implementing HIV prevention programs with adolescents at high risk for HIV infection</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hartman, Sherry</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern Mississippi</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">s.hartman@usm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Statistics have revealed that 60% to 80% of adolescents are sexually active by the age of 17. More recent literature indicates that many adolescents are waiting to have sex until &ldquo;the right time.&rdquo; When choosing the educational content or path, the professional is faced with an age-old ethical/moral debate of whether adults should provide risk-reduction intervention education versus provide abstinence-only messages, or even keep silent on the subject&mdash;a debate heralded by deeply-held emotions for educators, adolescents, and parents, no matter which path is chosen. The most critical question of concern is: Is the educator promoting or condoning sexual activity in adolescents if risk-reduction educational strategies, such as the use of condoms, are taught? Another question is: Is &ldquo;just saying no&rdquo; an acceptable solution when two loving, intimate adolescents are having a difficult time controlling their natural sexual urges? There are several psychosocial ramifications for adolescents undergoing HIV-related research. One ramification, in particular, may include emotional injury because of disclosure of information. A perceived fear or sense of threat of exposure may occur. Another ramification may occur after the nurse researcher has, for instance, administered HIV-related questionnaires that elicit information about sexuality, unprotected sex, and other sexual activity. The actual content on the questionnaire may provoke an injurious fear in the adolescent of already having had acquired HIV because of previous unprotected sexual activity. The purposes of this presentation are two-fold: (a) the researchers will relate their actual experiences of conducting research and implementing prevention educational programs with adolescents and (b) the researchers will provide theoretical and literature foundations for the ethical/moral issues of adolescents. Strategies will be offered that can be used by the nurse educator/research in order to reduce the chance of psychosocial injuries or ethical/moral dilemmas in adolescents and their families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:24Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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