2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149389
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bolivia Service Learning Project
Abstract:
Bolivia Service Learning Project
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Melland, Helen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Title:Assistant Professor
Education objectives: Learn about a collaborative, international, service-learning project to a third world country, Reflect on possible opportunities to design an international learning experiences Identify strategies to diminish obstacles encountered when planning an international learning experience Appreciate the importance of partnering with someone within the country to be visited when planning an international learning experience. Teaching by doing, a model of learning traditionally used by nurse educators, fits within the service-learning paradigm. This service-learning project promoted the value of diversity, strengthened interpersonal and communication skills of the students and leaders, promoted active learning, connected theory and practice, and promoted critical thinking - all benefits of service-learning. This presentation will describe the planning and implementation of a three week service- learning project which was sponsored by the University of North Dakota (UND) College of Nursing, a campus ministry association at UND, and the Peace Corps. Twelve university students, including undergraduate and graduate nursing students, traveled to Bolivia along with a nursing professor and a campus minister to learn and provide service. Students had the option of registering for the course for academic credit or approaching the experience strictly from a volunteer perspective. Academic demands were placed on those students registering for credit. While in Bolivia students worked building latrines and a water sanitation system in a rural community of about 500. This work involved collaboration with the Bolivian Red Cross as well as the Peace Corps. An immunization clinic was held for mothers, infants, and children with the assistance of Red Cross and Peace Corps volunteers. Those students who were nursing students had previously been taught injection procedures, but interested non-nursing students were trained in that procedure prior to leaving home. The group spent two days in another remote village working in an orphanage. The final work site was in a remote, indigenous village of about 40-50 adobe huts and a boarding school. The students helped to build a green house which would allow the natives to grow food throughout the year. Outcomes of the project are students and group leaders who: have an increased awareness, appreciation, and understanding of a third world culture; gained an understanding of health risks inherent in the culture of Bolivia; identified strategies that can improve health outcomes for people in Bolivia such as the development of water sanitation systems and immunizations; and developed skills at living in a third world culture. Through discussions at the conclusion of the trip and since returning, group members continue to reflect on their future roles in being sensitive to and advocating for vulnerable populations or minority groups. Discussions are planned with Peace Corps officials to explore the possibility of future similar projects.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBolivia Service Learning Projecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149389-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Bolivia Service Learning Project</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Melland, Helen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">helen_melland@mail.und.nodak.e</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Education objectives: Learn about a collaborative, international, service-learning project to a third world country, Reflect on possible opportunities to design an international learning experiences Identify strategies to diminish obstacles encountered when planning an international learning experience Appreciate the importance of partnering with someone within the country to be visited when planning an international learning experience. Teaching by doing, a model of learning traditionally used by nurse educators, fits within the service-learning paradigm. This service-learning project promoted the value of diversity, strengthened interpersonal and communication skills of the students and leaders, promoted active learning, connected theory and practice, and promoted critical thinking - all benefits of service-learning. This presentation will describe the planning and implementation of a three week service- learning project which was sponsored by the University of North Dakota (UND) College of Nursing, a campus ministry association at UND, and the Peace Corps. Twelve university students, including undergraduate and graduate nursing students, traveled to Bolivia along with a nursing professor and a campus minister to learn and provide service. Students had the option of registering for the course for academic credit or approaching the experience strictly from a volunteer perspective. Academic demands were placed on those students registering for credit. While in Bolivia students worked building latrines and a water sanitation system in a rural community of about 500. This work involved collaboration with the Bolivian Red Cross as well as the Peace Corps. An immunization clinic was held for mothers, infants, and children with the assistance of Red Cross and Peace Corps volunteers. Those students who were nursing students had previously been taught injection procedures, but interested non-nursing students were trained in that procedure prior to leaving home. The group spent two days in another remote village working in an orphanage. The final work site was in a remote, indigenous village of about 40-50 adobe huts and a boarding school. The students helped to build a green house which would allow the natives to grow food throughout the year. Outcomes of the project are students and group leaders who: have an increased awareness, appreciation, and understanding of a third world culture; gained an understanding of health risks inherent in the culture of Bolivia; identified strategies that can improve health outcomes for people in Bolivia such as the development of water sanitation systems and immunizations; and developed skills at living in a third world culture. Through discussions at the conclusion of the trip and since returning, group members continue to reflect on their future roles in being sensitive to and advocating for vulnerable populations or minority groups. Discussions are planned with Peace Corps officials to explore the possibility of future similar projects.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:26Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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