Application of Web-based Instruction To Amplify a Clinical Nursing Course

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149394
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Application of Web-based Instruction To Amplify a Clinical Nursing Course
Abstract:
Application of Web-based Instruction To Amplify a Clinical Nursing Course
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:DeBourgh, Gregory
P.I. Institution Name:University of San Francisco
The complexity of contemporary nursing practice demands that nurse educators design and employ innovative teaching and learning strategies to facilitate students’ development of both content and process knowledge- i.e. the complex content domains of theory and therapeutics, and metacognitive strategies to foster development of effective clinical reasoning and sound clinical judgment. Application of Web-based technology has been used extensively in theory courses. Use of this technology to amplify instruction in a clinical course and create a professional learning community is unique- particularly the use of text, visual, and audio learning prompts embedded in interactive, progressive clinical case study analyses. Telecommunications technology and course management software (WebCTSM ) are used to support coaching and collaboration, reflective practice, self-regulated learning, and the development of clinical reasoning skills among students in an adult nursing therapeutics course. The “Universal Design for Learning” model (O’Neill, 2001), based on new information about brain function, the neurological basis for differences among learners, and research on ways to use technology to expand opportunities for diverse learners, promotes three principles for effective instructional design. Learners should be provided: multiple representations of content during instruction, multiple options for expressing knowledge, and multiple options for engaging in learning. Building on these principles, Web-based technology is used as the course infrastructure to enable instruction for complex thinking and transfer of theory knowledge to clinical practice. Three instructional strategies are employed: (1) multimode instruction (visual, aural, and text learning prompts); (2) interactive online discussion to support witnessed dialogue, coaching, collaboration, and communication; and (3) reflection and self-regulated learning. Multiple methods of traditional and electronic communications are used to mirror the complexity of the clinical realm and to create a professionalizing community of learners. E-mail, file attachments, asynchronous threaded-message bulletin board, and links to informational resources on the Internet/World Wide Web are used to empower the faculty to enact the essential instructional tasks of: (1) scaffolding contextually-based learning through discussion of clinical problems and therapeutic interventions; (2) serving as exemplar clinician to model expert thinking processes; and (3) promoting a forum for interactive discussion without fear of judgment or assignment of a grade. Features of the course include: face-to-face group seminars and private coaching meetings between teacher and students during clinical rotations; telephone and e-mail consultations; weekly text-prompted, electronic reflective journals; open-topic threaded-message bulletin board group discussions; and progressive, interactive, online clinical case studies incorporating text, visual, and aural learning prompts. Combining visual, aural, and reflective text prompts during instruction amplifies learning by increasing reality, diversity, and complexity, promotes memory encoding in a manner that recall is facilitated and transfer of knowledge is enhanced, and improves performance in problem-solving transfer (DeBourgh, 2001). Observing the actions and dialogue of professional role models in learning contexts provides opportunities for students to witness the impact of knowledge, experience, and communication styles. Participating in interactive online group discussions about clinical issues, inquiries, and recent experiences engages students in witnessed dialogue and prompts their thinking about process skills- e.g. collaboration, communication, and heuristics for problem solving and decision-making. Self-regulated learning, i.e. the behaviorally active, self-structured seeking of knowledge, is prompted by questions that arise from online discussions and promoted by access to clinical resource sites on the Internet. Clinical reasoning skills are enhanced through interactive online discussions of students' own clinical experiences and via the progressive, “unfolding” cases posted on the bulletin board. Survey data suggest students find the “WebCourse” approach convenient, accessible, easy to learn, and affords them opportunities to refine communication and writing skills within a clinical context. The application of communications technology enables the intentional use of instructional strategies to foster communication, coaching, collaboration, and assists students to develop effective clinical reasoning. Using course management software empowers faculty to create a nexus or "web of professionals" to assist nursing students in their transition from students to novice nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApplication of Web-based Instruction To Amplify a Clinical Nursing Courseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149394-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Application of Web-based Instruction To Amplify a Clinical Nursing Course</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DeBourgh, Gregory</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">debourghg@usfca.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The complexity of contemporary nursing practice demands that nurse educators design and employ innovative teaching and learning strategies to facilitate students&rsquo; development of both content and process knowledge- i.e. the complex content domains of theory and therapeutics, and metacognitive strategies to foster development of effective clinical reasoning and sound clinical judgment. Application of Web-based technology has been used extensively in theory courses. Use of this technology to amplify instruction in a clinical course and create a professional learning community is unique- particularly the use of text, visual, and audio learning prompts embedded in interactive, progressive clinical case study analyses. Telecommunications technology and course management software (WebCTSM ) are used to support coaching and collaboration, reflective practice, self-regulated learning, and the development of clinical reasoning skills among students in an adult nursing therapeutics course. The &ldquo;Universal Design for Learning&rdquo; model (O&rsquo;Neill, 2001), based on new information about brain function, the neurological basis for differences among learners, and research on ways to use technology to expand opportunities for diverse learners, promotes three principles for effective instructional design. Learners should be provided: multiple representations of content during instruction, multiple options for expressing knowledge, and multiple options for engaging in learning. Building on these principles, Web-based technology is used as the course infrastructure to enable instruction for complex thinking and transfer of theory knowledge to clinical practice. Three instructional strategies are employed: (1) multimode instruction (visual, aural, and text learning prompts); (2) interactive online discussion to support witnessed dialogue, coaching, collaboration, and communication; and (3) reflection and self-regulated learning. Multiple methods of traditional and electronic communications are used to mirror the complexity of the clinical realm and to create a professionalizing community of learners. E-mail, file attachments, asynchronous threaded-message bulletin board, and links to informational resources on the Internet/World Wide Web are used to empower the faculty to enact the essential instructional tasks of: (1) scaffolding contextually-based learning through discussion of clinical problems and therapeutic interventions; (2) serving as exemplar clinician to model expert thinking processes; and (3) promoting a forum for interactive discussion without fear of judgment or assignment of a grade. Features of the course include: face-to-face group seminars and private coaching meetings between teacher and students during clinical rotations; telephone and e-mail consultations; weekly text-prompted, electronic reflective journals; open-topic threaded-message bulletin board group discussions; and progressive, interactive, online clinical case studies incorporating text, visual, and aural learning prompts. Combining visual, aural, and reflective text prompts during instruction amplifies learning by increasing reality, diversity, and complexity, promotes memory encoding in a manner that recall is facilitated and transfer of knowledge is enhanced, and improves performance in problem-solving transfer (DeBourgh, 2001). Observing the actions and dialogue of professional role models in learning contexts provides opportunities for students to witness the impact of knowledge, experience, and communication styles. Participating in interactive online group discussions about clinical issues, inquiries, and recent experiences engages students in witnessed dialogue and prompts their thinking about process skills- e.g. collaboration, communication, and heuristics for problem solving and decision-making. Self-regulated learning, i.e. the behaviorally active, self-structured seeking of knowledge, is prompted by questions that arise from online discussions and promoted by access to clinical resource sites on the Internet. Clinical reasoning skills are enhanced through interactive online discussions of students' own clinical experiences and via the progressive, &ldquo;unfolding&rdquo; cases posted on the bulletin board. Survey data suggest students find the &ldquo;WebCourse&rdquo; approach convenient, accessible, easy to learn, and affords them opportunities to refine communication and writing skills within a clinical context. The application of communications technology enables the intentional use of instructional strategies to foster communication, coaching, collaboration, and assists students to develop effective clinical reasoning. Using course management software empowers faculty to create a nexus or &quot;web of professionals&quot; to assist nursing students in their transition from students to novice nurses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:31Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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