Group Differences between Nursing and Medical Students Learning How to Perform an IV Venipuncture Using Technology or Traditional Laboratory Instruction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149397
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Group Differences between Nursing and Medical Students Learning How to Perform an IV Venipuncture Using Technology or Traditional Laboratory Instruction
Abstract:
Group Differences between Nursing and Medical Students Learning How to Perform an IV Venipuncture Using Technology or Traditional Laboratory Instruction
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Jeffries, Pamela
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Assistant Professor
The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of an interactive, multimedia CD-ROM with a cath simulator and a traditional laboratory experience of teaching the skill of IV venipuncture to both nursing and medical students. A randomized pretest-posttest experimental design was used. A total of 163 participants, 70 baccalaureate nursing students and 93 third year, medical students beginning their fundamental skills training were recruited for this study at a large Midwestern university. The students ranged in age from 20 to 55 years of age with the mean being 25 years. Fifty-eight per cent of the sample were female. Sixty-eight percent of the participants perceived themselves as having average computer skills with 25% declaring excellence in this area. Two methods were compared for teaching IV venipuncture: a scripted self-study module, a 20 minute videotape, instructor demonstration, and hands-on-experience using plastic, mannekin arms in the learning laboratory and an interactive multimedia, commercially-made CD-ROM and cath simulator program using virtual reality, covering the same content. There were no significant (p<.05) baseline differences of the pretest scores between the computer and the laboratory group. Results showed significant differences by groups in cognitive gains, students satisfaction, and documentation of the procedure (p < .05), with the traditional laboratory group having higher learner satisfaction, more complete documentation skills, and more cognitive gains after completing their method of instruction in the laboratory than the computer cath simulator group. The groups were similar in their ability to demonstrate the skill correctly on a hired simulated patient. This evaluation and assessment were beginning steps to assess new teaching methodologies and their effects on students learning outcomes and behaviors, including the transfer of learning a skill via a computer simulation to a real patient.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGroup Differences between Nursing and Medical Students Learning How to Perform an IV Venipuncture Using Technology or Traditional Laboratory Instructionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149397-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Group Differences between Nursing and Medical Students Learning How to Perform an IV Venipuncture Using Technology or Traditional Laboratory Instruction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jeffries, Pamela</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">prjeffri@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of an interactive, multimedia CD-ROM with a cath simulator and a traditional laboratory experience of teaching the skill of IV venipuncture to both nursing and medical students. A randomized pretest-posttest experimental design was used. A total of 163 participants, 70 baccalaureate nursing students and 93 third year, medical students beginning their fundamental skills training were recruited for this study at a large Midwestern university. The students ranged in age from 20 to 55 years of age with the mean being 25 years. Fifty-eight per cent of the sample were female. Sixty-eight percent of the participants perceived themselves as having average computer skills with 25% declaring excellence in this area. Two methods were compared for teaching IV venipuncture: a scripted self-study module, a 20 minute videotape, instructor demonstration, and hands-on-experience using plastic, mannekin arms in the learning laboratory and an interactive multimedia, commercially-made CD-ROM and cath simulator program using virtual reality, covering the same content. There were no significant (p<.05) baseline differences of the pretest scores between the computer and the laboratory group. Results showed significant differences by groups in cognitive gains, students satisfaction, and documentation of the procedure (p < .05), with the traditional laboratory group having higher learner satisfaction, more complete documentation skills, and more cognitive gains after completing their method of instruction in the laboratory than the computer cath simulator group. The groups were similar in their ability to demonstrate the skill correctly on a hired simulated patient. This evaluation and assessment were beginning steps to assess new teaching methodologies and their effects on students learning outcomes and behaviors, including the transfer of learning a skill via a computer simulation to a real patient.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:35Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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