A Thematic Analysis of Making a Decision to Place a Family Member with Alzheimer's Disease in a Special Care Unit

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149399
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Thematic Analysis of Making a Decision to Place a Family Member with Alzheimer's Disease in a Special Care Unit
Abstract:
A Thematic Analysis of Making a Decision to Place a Family Member with Alzheimer's Disease in a Special Care Unit
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Park, Myonghwa
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Post Doctoral Fellow
The decision to place a family member with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders (ADRD) in a nursing home special care unit (SCU) is a pivotal and often difficult event for family caregivers. Even though caring for a family member with ADRD is often stressful and frustrating, 80% of family caregivers are willing to sacrifice "quite a bit" or "practically anything to continue to care for their relative at home as long as possible. However, as the dementia progresses, many family members struggle with the decision to accept that placement in a SCU may be a necessity. Family members often experience moral conflicts and describe nursing home placement of a relative as one of the most difficult situations they ever faced. Yet, few studies have focused on family caregivers experiences of making the decision to place a family member in a nursing home or special care unit. There remains a lack of in-depth understanding of the experience of making a decision to place a family member with the diagnosis of ADRD in a SCU that is grounded in the experiences and perceptions of family caregivers. In particular, there are few in-depth qualitative studies based on a more diverse samples of ADRD family caregivers who have made the decision to place a family member is a SCU focusing on the decision making experience. The purpose of this study was to identify the essential patterns describing the experience of making the decision to place a family member in a SCU in a more diverse sample of ADRD family caregivers. Thirty transcribed interviews from a larger sample of 256 ADRD family caregivers who all made the decision to place a family member in a SCU were selected for thematic analysis. To achieve maximum variation of the sample, a random selection approach was used stratified according to ethnicity, gender, and relationship to the care receiver. In the sample of 30 family caregivers, there were six African-Americans, 15 white non-Hispanics, and three Native Americans. Of the six male caregivers, two were husbands and four were sons and among the 24 female family caregivers, 17 were daughters and seven were wives. The interviews with the family caregiver ranged form 1 hour to over 3 hours and were conducted by clinical nurse specialists or a gerontology specialist trained by an expert consultant in qualitative data collection approaches. Each transcribed interview was analyzed independently by a team of three researchers using Luborsky's method for thematic analysis. Thematic analysis is a qualitative analysis approach that affords direct representation the caregivers perspective by a content analysis of their experiences, beliefs, and perceptions. The process of data interpretation involved independent and then consensual interpretation of all aspects of the text. After mutual consensus, 1565 themes (descriptive statements) were identified and sorted into 21 topics (common categories). The 21 topics were then synthesized into four universal Patterns describing the decision making experience. The four patterns were: a) moving toward an unavoidable decision; b) struggling with the decision; c) seeking reassurance; and d) remaining connected. While family caregivers found the experience "the most painful decision I ever had to make," family members found comfort when: a) health care professionals supported them during the decision making process; b) when they were satisfied with the quality of care in the SCU; and c) there were means for family members to remain involved in the care of their relative after they were relocated to a SCU.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Thematic Analysis of Making a Decision to Place a Family Member with Alzheimer's Disease in a Special Care Uniten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149399-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Thematic Analysis of Making a Decision to Place a Family Member with Alzheimer's Disease in a Special Care Unit</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Park, Myonghwa</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Post Doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">myonghwa-park@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The decision to place a family member with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders (ADRD) in a nursing home special care unit (SCU) is a pivotal and often difficult event for family caregivers. Even though caring for a family member with ADRD is often stressful and frustrating, 80% of family caregivers are willing to sacrifice &quot;quite a bit&quot; or &quot;practically anything to continue to care for their relative at home as long as possible. However, as the dementia progresses, many family members struggle with the decision to accept that placement in a SCU may be a necessity. Family members often experience moral conflicts and describe nursing home placement of a relative as one of the most difficult situations they ever faced. Yet, few studies have focused on family caregivers experiences of making the decision to place a family member in a nursing home or special care unit. There remains a lack of in-depth understanding of the experience of making a decision to place a family member with the diagnosis of ADRD in a SCU that is grounded in the experiences and perceptions of family caregivers. In particular, there are few in-depth qualitative studies based on a more diverse samples of ADRD family caregivers who have made the decision to place a family member is a SCU focusing on the decision making experience. The purpose of this study was to identify the essential patterns describing the experience of making the decision to place a family member in a SCU in a more diverse sample of ADRD family caregivers. Thirty transcribed interviews from a larger sample of 256 ADRD family caregivers who all made the decision to place a family member in a SCU were selected for thematic analysis. To achieve maximum variation of the sample, a random selection approach was used stratified according to ethnicity, gender, and relationship to the care receiver. In the sample of 30 family caregivers, there were six African-Americans, 15 white non-Hispanics, and three Native Americans. Of the six male caregivers, two were husbands and four were sons and among the 24 female family caregivers, 17 were daughters and seven were wives. The interviews with the family caregiver ranged form 1 hour to over 3 hours and were conducted by clinical nurse specialists or a gerontology specialist trained by an expert consultant in qualitative data collection approaches. Each transcribed interview was analyzed independently by a team of three researchers using Luborsky's method for thematic analysis. Thematic analysis is a qualitative analysis approach that affords direct representation the caregivers perspective by a content analysis of their experiences, beliefs, and perceptions. The process of data interpretation involved independent and then consensual interpretation of all aspects of the text. After mutual consensus, 1565 themes (descriptive statements) were identified and sorted into 21 topics (common categories). The 21 topics were then synthesized into four universal Patterns describing the decision making experience. The four patterns were: a) moving toward an unavoidable decision; b) struggling with the decision; c) seeking reassurance; and d) remaining connected. While family caregivers found the experience &quot;the most painful decision I ever had to make,&quot; family members found comfort when: a) health care professionals supported them during the decision making process; b) when they were satisfied with the quality of care in the SCU; and c) there were means for family members to remain involved in the care of their relative after they were relocated to a SCU.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:37Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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