Life meanings and the experience of cancer: Application of Newman’s Method and Phenomenological Analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149402
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Life meanings and the experience of cancer: Application of Newman’s Method and Phenomenological Analysis
Abstract:
Life meanings and the experience of cancer: Application of Newman’s Method and Phenomenological Analysis
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Barron, Anne-Marie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Simmons College
Title:Assistant Professor
The purpose of this qualitative research study was to answer the following questions: How do the life patterns described by persons with cancer express meaning and expansion of consciousness over time? What facilitates or hinders expansion of consciousness in persons with cancer? How is spirituality manifested in the narratives of persons with cancer? The study was guided by Margaret Newman’s theoretical perspective within Health as Expanding Consciousness. Newman’s research method was combined with phenomenology. Newman’s method facilitated understanding of individual experience and identification of pattern. Phenomenology offered additional techniques for analysis across participants. The interview text was considered in relation to critical attributes of spirituality. Participants, twenty-two adults of varying ethnic backgrounds, diagnosed with cancer and hospitalized in an acute care or rehabilitation hospital setting or receiving hospice care in their homes, formed the study sample. Ages ranged from twenty-two to eighty-nine years of age. Most participants had advanced forms of cancer. Each participant’s pattern revealed growth and increasing awareness of self and environment. For the majority of the study participants, the crisis of cancer created chaos but then led to acceleration in a lifelong journey of seeking meaning. This resulted in profound insight and deep personal understandings. Expansion of consciousness was facilitated by a search for meaning, loving relationships, and reflecting on the whole of life. The process seemed to be hindered by painful, unresolved, lost relationships and disconnection from lifelong pattern. Spirituality as a term had limited meaning for many participants, yet each story revealed deeply spiritual perspectives highlighting the importance of love, compassion, gratitude, and grace. Four phenomenological themes emerged: the anguish of suffering; the inextricable link between coping and hope; spirituality embedded in day-to-day living; and self-awareness and transformation. Findings from the study have important implications for nursing practice, research, education and health care policy. The study adds to the empirical support of Newman’s Theory of Health as Expanding Consciousness and demonstrates the feasibility of combining the Newman method with phenomenology.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLife meanings and the experience of cancer: Application of Newman’s Method and Phenomenological Analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149402-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Life meanings and the experience of cancer: Application of Newman&rsquo;s Method and Phenomenological Analysis</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barron, Anne-Marie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Simmons College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">abarron34@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this qualitative research study was to answer the following questions: How do the life patterns described by persons with cancer express meaning and expansion of consciousness over time? What facilitates or hinders expansion of consciousness in persons with cancer? How is spirituality manifested in the narratives of persons with cancer? The study was guided by Margaret Newman&rsquo;s theoretical perspective within Health as Expanding Consciousness. Newman&rsquo;s research method was combined with phenomenology. Newman&rsquo;s method facilitated understanding of individual experience and identification of pattern. Phenomenology offered additional techniques for analysis across participants. The interview text was considered in relation to critical attributes of spirituality. Participants, twenty-two adults of varying ethnic backgrounds, diagnosed with cancer and hospitalized in an acute care or rehabilitation hospital setting or receiving hospice care in their homes, formed the study sample. Ages ranged from twenty-two to eighty-nine years of age. Most participants had advanced forms of cancer. Each participant&rsquo;s pattern revealed growth and increasing awareness of self and environment. For the majority of the study participants, the crisis of cancer created chaos but then led to acceleration in a lifelong journey of seeking meaning. This resulted in profound insight and deep personal understandings. Expansion of consciousness was facilitated by a search for meaning, loving relationships, and reflecting on the whole of life. The process seemed to be hindered by painful, unresolved, lost relationships and disconnection from lifelong pattern. Spirituality as a term had limited meaning for many participants, yet each story revealed deeply spiritual perspectives highlighting the importance of love, compassion, gratitude, and grace. Four phenomenological themes emerged: the anguish of suffering; the inextricable link between coping and hope; spirituality embedded in day-to-day living; and self-awareness and transformation. Findings from the study have important implications for nursing practice, research, education and health care policy. The study adds to the empirical support of Newman&rsquo;s Theory of Health as Expanding Consciousness and demonstrates the feasibility of combining the Newman method with phenomenology.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:41Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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