Relationship of Chronic Pain and Immune Function in a Chronic Pain Population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149404
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship of Chronic Pain and Immune Function in a Chronic Pain Population
Abstract:
Relationship of Chronic Pain and Immune Function in a Chronic Pain Population
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Vines, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern Maine
Although there is mounting evidence demonstrating significant linkages between stress and immune function, there have been only a few studies that have examined immune function with patients experiencing chronic pain. Also lacking are investigations that have examined the possible mediating effects of depression and health behaviors on immune response in this group of patients. Objectives: The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the relationship between chronic pain and immune function, and (2) to examine the effects of depression and health behaviors as potential mediators between chronic back pain and immunity. Design: non-experimental, ex post facto. Sample: Forty-seven chronic back pain subjects were compared with 47 asymptomatic control subjects matched for age and sex. Every subject was followed for 20 days with dependent measures collected twice (Time 1 as baseline: Time 2, 20 days after baseline). Setting: Chronic pain patients were recruited from multiple employment sites and from physician offices in a small Northeastern city. Control subjects were recruited from multiple employment settings, including a local university. Variables: The variables of interest included, pain levels, immune function, depression and health behaviors and length of time with chronic pain. Instruments: Depression was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory; pain levels were measured by the short-form of the McGill Pain instrument; and health behaviors were measured by the Personal Lifestyle Questionnaire. Incidence of infectious illnesses was monitored throughout the course of the study using the Health Review Checklist. Immune Function: The immunological markers selected for immune function were Natural Killer (NK) cell activity and T-cell lymphocyte proliferation as measured by the mitogens Concanavalin A (ConA) and Phytohemagglutinin (PHA). These markers were obtained from subjects via intravenous blood draws collected twice, 20 days apart, and between 2-4 pm. Findings: Data analyses showed no significant differences across the measurement periods (T1 and T2) for all outcome variables. As a result, we used variable averages of T1/T2 for all analyses. A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA, with depression and health behaviors as the covariates) was statistically significant for NK cell activity, with the pain group showing more aggressive activity than the control group. Significant group differences in T-cell proliferative response to ConA also were found using a MANCOVA (controlling for depression and health behaviors). Chronic pain subjects who reported > 96 months with back pain and who reported higher pain levels showed less proliferation than those with < 96 months or those with no pain. Conclusions: Data from the study suggest that chronic pain subjects who have lived with chronic pain greater than 96 months or experienced higher pain levels may have a less responsive immune system. However, further research is needed to determine the impact of chronic pain on immunity and health outcomes as well as the role of pain levels in determining immune. Implications: Data from this study provide valuable information regarding the possible effects of chronic pain on immunity as well as the mediating effects of depression and health behaviors. Considering the tremendous drain that individuals with chronic pain place on their employers, families and the health care system, it is important to continue with immune research that is specifically tailored to this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship of Chronic Pain and Immune Function in a Chronic Pain Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149404-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship of Chronic Pain and Immune Function in a Chronic Pain Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vines, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern Maine</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">svines@usm.maine.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although there is mounting evidence demonstrating significant linkages between stress and immune function, there have been only a few studies that have examined immune function with patients experiencing chronic pain. Also lacking are investigations that have examined the possible mediating effects of depression and health behaviors on immune response in this group of patients. Objectives: The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the relationship between chronic pain and immune function, and (2) to examine the effects of depression and health behaviors as potential mediators between chronic back pain and immunity. Design: non-experimental, ex post facto. Sample: Forty-seven chronic back pain subjects were compared with 47 asymptomatic control subjects matched for age and sex. Every subject was followed for 20 days with dependent measures collected twice (Time 1 as baseline: Time 2, 20 days after baseline). Setting: Chronic pain patients were recruited from multiple employment sites and from physician offices in a small Northeastern city. Control subjects were recruited from multiple employment settings, including a local university. Variables: The variables of interest included, pain levels, immune function, depression and health behaviors and length of time with chronic pain. Instruments: Depression was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory; pain levels were measured by the short-form of the McGill Pain instrument; and health behaviors were measured by the Personal Lifestyle Questionnaire. Incidence of infectious illnesses was monitored throughout the course of the study using the Health Review Checklist. Immune Function: The immunological markers selected for immune function were Natural Killer (NK) cell activity and T-cell lymphocyte proliferation as measured by the mitogens Concanavalin A (ConA) and Phytohemagglutinin (PHA). These markers were obtained from subjects via intravenous blood draws collected twice, 20 days apart, and between 2-4 pm. Findings: Data analyses showed no significant differences across the measurement periods (T1 and T2) for all outcome variables. As a result, we used variable averages of T1/T2 for all analyses. A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA, with depression and health behaviors as the covariates) was statistically significant for NK cell activity, with the pain group showing more aggressive activity than the control group. Significant group differences in T-cell proliferative response to ConA also were found using a MANCOVA (controlling for depression and health behaviors). Chronic pain subjects who reported &gt; 96 months with back pain and who reported higher pain levels showed less proliferation than those with &lt; 96 months or those with no pain. Conclusions: Data from the study suggest that chronic pain subjects who have lived with chronic pain greater than 96 months or experienced higher pain levels may have a less responsive immune system. However, further research is needed to determine the impact of chronic pain on immunity and health outcomes as well as the role of pain levels in determining immune. Implications: Data from this study provide valuable information regarding the possible effects of chronic pain on immunity as well as the mediating effects of depression and health behaviors. Considering the tremendous drain that individuals with chronic pain place on their employers, families and the health care system, it is important to continue with immune research that is specifically tailored to this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:43Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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