Differences between Single and Married Primiparas on the Parenting Stress Index/Short Form

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149405
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Differences between Single and Married Primiparas on the Parenting Stress Index/Short Form
Abstract:
Differences between Single and Married Primiparas on the Parenting Stress Index/Short Form
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Copeland, Debra
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern Mississippi
The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between single and married primiparas on the Parenting Stress Index/Shortform (Abidin, 1990). Parenting stress has been shown to affect the relationship between the mother and infant. Single mothers may experience more parenting stress due to lack of social support. This study determines the differences in parenting stress according to marital status. The secondary analysis of this instrument is a part of another larger study on maternal competence and health status in early parenthood. The convenience sample consisted of 80 first-time mothers who were surveyed in the postpartum period between six to eight weeks. Of the 80 participants, 58 women were married and 22 were single. The study participants were recruited in postpartum units from two hospitals in a large metropolitan city in the Southeast United States. At the time of hospitalization, participants completed a demographic sheet and were sent the Parenting Stress Index/Short form to complete at six weeks after childbirth. The Parenting Stress Index/Short Form (PSI/SF) is a derivative of the original Parenting Stress Index full-length tool (Abidin, 1990). The long form was normed on mothers of infants and children from one month to twelve years of age (Abidin, 1983). A short form was needed in the clinical area to assess stress in the parent-stress system. Using factor analysis, three subscales were derived. The three subscales of the PSI/SF include: a) parental distress (PD), determines the degree of distress a parent is experiencing in the parent role, b) Parent-Child Dysfunctional Interaction (P-CDI), determines a parent’s expectation of infant, and c) Difficult Child (DC), focuses on behavioral characteristics of the child. Using a five point Likert scale, the participant scores parenting statements. High scores reflect more parenting stress than lower scores. The PSI/SF has demonstrated acceptable reliability and validity in the literature. The reliability estimate using Cronbach’s alpha in this study was .94. Descriptive statistics were used to assess demographic data and mean scores. T-test were used to assess for significant differences between the means. Study findings indicate significant difference between single and married women in the Parental Distress subscale (p=.001) and the Difficult Child subscale (p=.046). The total parenting stress scores between married and single women indicated a statistical significance of .005. Single mothers indicated more stress than married mothers related to parenting stress and the infant. Overall, single mothers scored higher on the PSI/SF than married mothers. Single women may experience more stress as a new mother. It is important to understand the specific stressors of new, single mothers and to develop nursing interventions that decrease parenting stress in single mothers. More research is needed to define specific stressors of single mothers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDifferences between Single and Married Primiparas on the Parenting Stress Index/Short Formen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149405-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Differences between Single and Married Primiparas on the Parenting Stress Index/Short Form</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Copeland, Debra</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern Mississippi</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">debra.copeland@usm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between single and married primiparas on the Parenting Stress Index/Shortform (Abidin, 1990). Parenting stress has been shown to affect the relationship between the mother and infant. Single mothers may experience more parenting stress due to lack of social support. This study determines the differences in parenting stress according to marital status. The secondary analysis of this instrument is a part of another larger study on maternal competence and health status in early parenthood. The convenience sample consisted of 80 first-time mothers who were surveyed in the postpartum period between six to eight weeks. Of the 80 participants, 58 women were married and 22 were single. The study participants were recruited in postpartum units from two hospitals in a large metropolitan city in the Southeast United States. At the time of hospitalization, participants completed a demographic sheet and were sent the Parenting Stress Index/Short form to complete at six weeks after childbirth. The Parenting Stress Index/Short Form (PSI/SF) is a derivative of the original Parenting Stress Index full-length tool (Abidin, 1990). The long form was normed on mothers of infants and children from one month to twelve years of age (Abidin, 1983). A short form was needed in the clinical area to assess stress in the parent-stress system. Using factor analysis, three subscales were derived. The three subscales of the PSI/SF include: a) parental distress (PD), determines the degree of distress a parent is experiencing in the parent role, b) Parent-Child Dysfunctional Interaction (P-CDI), determines a parent&rsquo;s expectation of infant, and c) Difficult Child (DC), focuses on behavioral characteristics of the child. Using a five point Likert scale, the participant scores parenting statements. High scores reflect more parenting stress than lower scores. The PSI/SF has demonstrated acceptable reliability and validity in the literature. The reliability estimate using Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha in this study was .94. Descriptive statistics were used to assess demographic data and mean scores. T-test were used to assess for significant differences between the means. Study findings indicate significant difference between single and married women in the Parental Distress subscale (p=.001) and the Difficult Child subscale (p=.046). The total parenting stress scores between married and single women indicated a statistical significance of .005. Single mothers indicated more stress than married mothers related to parenting stress and the infant. Overall, single mothers scored higher on the PSI/SF than married mothers. Single women may experience more stress as a new mother. It is important to understand the specific stressors of new, single mothers and to develop nursing interventions that decrease parenting stress in single mothers. More research is needed to define specific stressors of single mothers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:45Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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