Effects of an Educational Program on Breast and Cervical Health Knowledge and Screening Practices

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149406
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of an Educational Program on Breast and Cervical Health Knowledge and Screening Practices
Abstract:
Effects of an Educational Program on Breast and Cervical Health Knowledge and Screening Practices
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Kessler, Theresa
P.I. Institution Name:Valparaiso University
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The key to successful treatment and survival for women who develop breast and/or cervical cancer is early detection. Thus, it is important to assess women’s understanding of breast and cervical health and the mechanisms that underlie behavior change leading to early detection. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an educational program on breast and cervical health knowledge and screening behaviors. Design: Self-efficacy theory provided a framework for this study. A pre-test/post-test design was used to assess understanding of breast and cervical health following an educational program. Longitudinal data were collected at least one year following the educational program to assess behavior change. Sample: The sample consisted of 56 women who attended the educational program and 47 women who completed the longitudinal data. Setting: Women participated in the educational program through a health fair at their place of employment or attended a community service program open to the public. Names of Variables: Knowledge of breast and cervical health practices and screening guidelines was measured along with the frequency of screening practices. Measures/Instruments: The Knowledge of Breast and Cervical Health instrument assessed knowledge and screening guidelines for breast and cervical health. It contained 10 questions with scores ranging from 1-10; higher scores indicted greater knowledge. A self-report instrument provided sociodemographic information along with frequency of screening practices. Findings: The women ranged in age from 21 to 60 (M = 39.9, S.D. = 9.92) and all had at least a high school education. There was a significant difference in pre-test (M = 7.94) and post-test (M = 8.89) scores (t = -4.594, p<.001). The majority of the sample was familiar with recommended screening guidelines for both breast once cervical health; however, fewer women knew the effectiveness of mammography and the symptomology of precancerous cervical changes. Age was not related to pre-test knowledge (r=-.08, p=.61) but was negatively related to post-test knowledge (r=-.30, p=.04). Longitudinal data demonstrated the educational program resulted in some women adopting screening behaviors over time. The rate of completing mammography and PAP test increased but the practice of BSE did not change. Conclusions: The findings suggested that an educational program based on self-efficacy theory could increase knowledge of breast and cervical health and potentially lead to early detection. Implications: Women must be taught how to take an active role in the early detection and screening of breast and cervical health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of an Educational Program on Breast and Cervical Health Knowledge and Screening Practicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149406-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of an Educational Program on Breast and Cervical Health Knowledge and Screening Practices</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kessler, Theresa</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Valparaiso University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Terry.Kessler@valpo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The key to successful treatment and survival for women who develop breast and/or cervical cancer is early detection. Thus, it is important to assess women&rsquo;s understanding of breast and cervical health and the mechanisms that underlie behavior change leading to early detection. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of an educational program on breast and cervical health knowledge and screening behaviors. Design: Self-efficacy theory provided a framework for this study. A pre-test/post-test design was used to assess understanding of breast and cervical health following an educational program. Longitudinal data were collected at least one year following the educational program to assess behavior change. Sample: The sample consisted of 56 women who attended the educational program and 47 women who completed the longitudinal data. Setting: Women participated in the educational program through a health fair at their place of employment or attended a community service program open to the public. Names of Variables: Knowledge of breast and cervical health practices and screening guidelines was measured along with the frequency of screening practices. Measures/Instruments: The Knowledge of Breast and Cervical Health instrument assessed knowledge and screening guidelines for breast and cervical health. It contained 10 questions with scores ranging from 1-10; higher scores indicted greater knowledge. A self-report instrument provided sociodemographic information along with frequency of screening practices. Findings: The women ranged in age from 21 to 60 (M = 39.9, S.D. = 9.92) and all had at least a high school education. There was a significant difference in pre-test (M = 7.94) and post-test (M = 8.89) scores (t = -4.594, p&lt;.001). The majority of the sample was familiar with recommended screening guidelines for both breast once cervical health; however, fewer women knew the effectiveness of mammography and the symptomology of precancerous cervical changes. Age was not related to pre-test knowledge (r=-.08, p=.61) but was negatively related to post-test knowledge (r=-.30, p=.04). Longitudinal data demonstrated the educational program resulted in some women adopting screening behaviors over time. The rate of completing mammography and PAP test increased but the practice of BSE did not change. Conclusions: The findings suggested that an educational program based on self-efficacy theory could increase knowledge of breast and cervical health and potentially lead to early detection. Implications: Women must be taught how to take an active role in the early detection and screening of breast and cervical health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:46Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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