2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149407
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reversal Theory States in Smoking Cessation among Adolescents
Abstract:
Reversal Theory States in Smoking Cessation among Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Burris, Rebecca, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Arkansas Tech University
Title:Department Head, Nursing
Background: Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Although 67% of adolescent smokers say they want to quit, five million living today are expected to die as a direct consequence of tobacco use because smoking prevention and cessation programs for adolescent smokers are not working. Success rates for cessation attempts are about 3%, demonstrating the need for more effective interventions to aid in quitting. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to predict whether adolescents who are trying to quit smoking would lapse (smoke a cigarette) or resist (not smoke a cigarette) during highly tempting situations using the psychological states described in reversal theory. Design: This was a descriptive study using a demographic questionnaire and in-depth semi-structured interviews. Sample: The sample included 62 adolescents ages 14-19 who had participated in a smoking cessation program. Setting: Eight Arkansas high schools including urban and rural. Name of Variables: The variables under study were telic/paratelic metamotivational states, cigarette availability, and lapse during smoking cessation. Measures/Instruments: Interview data from 62 subjects was coded with the “Metamotivational State Interview and Coding Schedule.” Hypotheses derived from reversal theory were analyzed using chi-square and logistic regression. Findings: Adolescents in the paratelic metamotivational state (OR: 15.3) or with cigarettes readily available (OR: 4.6) were more likely to lapse than adolescents in the telic state (p<. 001) or those requiring effort to obtain cigarettes (p<. 001). Knowledge of telic/paratelic metamotivational state and cigarette availability accurately predicted the outcome of highly tempting situations 77-89% of the time. Conclusions: Adolescents who smoke challenge nurses practicing in a variety of settings to provide effective counseling and coping strategies for quitting smoking. Using reversal theory constructs to develop state-specific strategies shows promise as an additional tool for coping with temptation to smoke episodes in this age group.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReversal Theory States in Smoking Cessation among Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149407-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reversal Theory States in Smoking Cessation among Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burris, Rebecca, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arkansas Tech University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Department Head, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rebecca.burris@mail.atu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Although 67% of adolescent smokers say they want to quit, five million living today are expected to die as a direct consequence of tobacco use because smoking prevention and cessation programs for adolescent smokers are not working. Success rates for cessation attempts are about 3%, demonstrating the need for more effective interventions to aid in quitting. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to predict whether adolescents who are trying to quit smoking would lapse (smoke a cigarette) or resist (not smoke a cigarette) during highly tempting situations using the psychological states described in reversal theory. Design: This was a descriptive study using a demographic questionnaire and in-depth semi-structured interviews. Sample: The sample included 62 adolescents ages 14-19 who had participated in a smoking cessation program. Setting: Eight Arkansas high schools including urban and rural. Name of Variables: The variables under study were telic/paratelic metamotivational states, cigarette availability, and lapse during smoking cessation. Measures/Instruments: Interview data from 62 subjects was coded with the &ldquo;Metamotivational State Interview and Coding Schedule.&rdquo; Hypotheses derived from reversal theory were analyzed using chi-square and logistic regression. Findings: Adolescents in the paratelic metamotivational state (OR: 15.3) or with cigarettes readily available (OR: 4.6) were more likely to lapse than adolescents in the telic state (p&lt;. 001) or those requiring effort to obtain cigarettes (p&lt;. 001). Knowledge of telic/paratelic metamotivational state and cigarette availability accurately predicted the outcome of highly tempting situations 77-89% of the time. Conclusions: Adolescents who smoke challenge nurses practicing in a variety of settings to provide effective counseling and coping strategies for quitting smoking. Using reversal theory constructs to develop state-specific strategies shows promise as an additional tool for coping with temptation to smoke episodes in this age group.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:47Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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