2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149408
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Developmental Behavioral View of Infant Irritability
Abstract:
A Developmental Behavioral View of Infant Irritability
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Keefe, Maureen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Medical University of South Carolina
Objective and Purpose: Unexplained infant crying or colic is the most common pediatric problem in the first year of life. Investigators and care providers are becoming increasingly concerned regarding the potential for abuse and neglect in families with these infants who cry for hours on a daily basis and are very difficult to console. Although several studies have been conducted over the last several decades, effective management strategies and appropriate information for parents regarding the etiology of this mysterious malady is still very limited. The purpose of this research study is to test a home-based, nursing intervention for these infants and their families that is based on a new conceptual understanding of the origins of infant irritability. This first presentation will summarize the findings from previous studies and present the conceptual framework that has guided the investigations conducted by this nursing research team. The intervention that has evolved over the past ten years is referred to as the REST regimen and is generated from a developmental behavior perspective. It is based on efforts to regulate and reduce the infant’s level of arousal by environmental and behavioral restructuring. Parents are provided support, reassurance, and specific techniques to utilize with their infants. Design and Research Hypotheses: The current study is a randomized clinical trail that is being conducted in Charleston, South Carolina and Denver, Colorado. The following two parental and two infant research hypotheses will be systematically evaluated in this clinical trial: (a) parents who receive the REST regimen will report less parental stress and exhibit more synchrony than parents who do not receive the REST regimen; (b) infants who receive the REST Regimen will demonstrate more state stability and less irritability than infants who receive routine care. Methods and Conclusion: The intervention program referred to as The REST Regimen for Infant Irritability, has two major components: one focused on the infant – Regulation, Entrainment, Structure and Touch; and the other focused on the parent – Reassurance, Empathy, Support, and Time-Out. A team of advanced practice nurses delivers the program in the home and incorporates the use of infant behavioral assessment, pattern recognition, videotapes, parent support and other educational materials. The family and infant are placed on a daily schedule of routine activities to reduce arousal and prevent overstimulation. A separate, trained evaluation team takes measurements at baseline and at prespecified intervals during the 4 weeks following the intervention program. The long term goal of this work is to test a theoretically consistent intervention that will be effective in working with families with fussy or irritable infants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Developmental Behavioral View of Infant Irritabilityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149408-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Developmental Behavioral View of Infant Irritability</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keefe, Maureen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical University of South Carolina</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">keefem@musc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective and Purpose: Unexplained infant crying or colic is the most common pediatric problem in the first year of life. Investigators and care providers are becoming increasingly concerned regarding the potential for abuse and neglect in families with these infants who cry for hours on a daily basis and are very difficult to console. Although several studies have been conducted over the last several decades, effective management strategies and appropriate information for parents regarding the etiology of this mysterious malady is still very limited. The purpose of this research study is to test a home-based, nursing intervention for these infants and their families that is based on a new conceptual understanding of the origins of infant irritability. This first presentation will summarize the findings from previous studies and present the conceptual framework that has guided the investigations conducted by this nursing research team. The intervention that has evolved over the past ten years is referred to as the REST regimen and is generated from a developmental behavior perspective. It is based on efforts to regulate and reduce the infant&rsquo;s level of arousal by environmental and behavioral restructuring. Parents are provided support, reassurance, and specific techniques to utilize with their infants. Design and Research Hypotheses: The current study is a randomized clinical trail that is being conducted in Charleston, South Carolina and Denver, Colorado. The following two parental and two infant research hypotheses will be systematically evaluated in this clinical trial: (a) parents who receive the REST regimen will report less parental stress and exhibit more synchrony than parents who do not receive the REST regimen; (b) infants who receive the REST Regimen will demonstrate more state stability and less irritability than infants who receive routine care. Methods and Conclusion: The intervention program referred to as The REST Regimen for Infant Irritability, has two major components: one focused on the infant &ndash; Regulation, Entrainment, Structure and Touch; and the other focused on the parent &ndash; Reassurance, Empathy, Support, and Time-Out. A team of advanced practice nurses delivers the program in the home and incorporates the use of infant behavioral assessment, pattern recognition, videotapes, parent support and other educational materials. The family and infant are placed on a daily schedule of routine activities to reduce arousal and prevent overstimulation. A separate, trained evaluation team takes measurements at baseline and at prespecified intervals during the 4 weeks following the intervention program. The long term goal of this work is to test a theoretically consistent intervention that will be effective in working with families with fussy or irritable infants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:48Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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