Correlates of Self-Reported Use of Alternative and Complementary Therapies in Persons with HIV/AIDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149414
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates of Self-Reported Use of Alternative and Complementary Therapies in Persons with HIV/AIDS
Abstract:
Correlates of Self-Reported Use of Alternative and Complementary Therapies in Persons with HIV/AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Kirksey, Kenn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:California State University-Fresno
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: Persons living with HIV/AIDS are challenged to manage disease and treatment-related symptoms with provider-directed or client-initiated self-care measures. The objective of this study was to identify complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies used as self-care strategies. The use of CAM in HIV care has recently increased, as people become more knowledgeable about treatment options from healthcare providers, media sources, and through social support networks. Design: Using a cross-sectional, descriptive design, self-reported data were collected on HIV-related symptoms, health-related quality of life, and CAM therapy use. Sample: This paper reports frequency and mean effectiveness of CAM use in a community-based sample of 339 HIV-infected persons between the ages of 18 and 66, with a mean age of 40 years (+/- 8.4). The sample was comprised of 111 females and 228 males, 72.6% were African-American, 8.8% Hispanic, 15.3% white, and 3.3 other. Approximately 60% had completed high school and 12% had college degrees. The mean CD4 count was 452 cells/mm3 (+/- 315) and the mean viral load was 12760 (+/-24554). Setting: Data were collected at an outpatient AIDS clinic in Texas. Name of Variables or Concept: HIV-related symptoms, health-related quality of life, and CAM therapy use. Measures/Instruments: This study sample completed an assessment packet that included sociodemographic data, Survey of Complementary Therapies, Sign and Symptom Checklist for Persons with HIV Disease, Living with HIV Scale, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36. Findings: Using variables that were either classically demographic (e.g., gender, age) or those that showed significant zero order correlation, a hierarchical regression model was applied. The overall model at the last step explained 11.2% of the variance (F 7,331=5.952, p=0.000). African-Americans used the most CAM therapies, while Hispanics and subjects who perceived themselves as sicker used fewer CAM therapies. The top three CAM treatments identified by rank order of “yes” responses, percent use, and mean effectiveness were: prayer (n=290, 85.5%), spiritual activities (n=162, 47.8%), and meditation (n=143, 42.2%). Conclusions: African-Americans in this sample used more CAM therapies, while people who perceived themselves as being sicker used fewer non-allopathic interventions. Spirituality and prayer were the most frequently reported CAM therapies used to manage HIV-associated symptoms. Implications: There is clear evidence in the literature about widespread use of these modalities in HIV-infected persons, but evidence-based studies to explore reasons for use and treatment efficacy are still needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates of Self-Reported Use of Alternative and Complementary Therapies in Persons with HIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149414-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Correlates of Self-Reported Use of Alternative and Complementary Therapies in Persons with HIV/AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kirksey, Kenn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University-Fresno</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kkirksey@csufresno.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Persons living with HIV/AIDS are challenged to manage disease and treatment-related symptoms with provider-directed or client-initiated self-care measures. The objective of this study was to identify complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies used as self-care strategies. The use of CAM in HIV care has recently increased, as people become more knowledgeable about treatment options from healthcare providers, media sources, and through social support networks. Design: Using a cross-sectional, descriptive design, self-reported data were collected on HIV-related symptoms, health-related quality of life, and CAM therapy use. Sample: This paper reports frequency and mean effectiveness of CAM use in a community-based sample of 339 HIV-infected persons between the ages of 18 and 66, with a mean age of 40 years (+/- 8.4). The sample was comprised of 111 females and 228 males, 72.6% were African-American, 8.8% Hispanic, 15.3% white, and 3.3 other. Approximately 60% had completed high school and 12% had college degrees. The mean CD4 count was 452 cells/mm3 (+/- 315) and the mean viral load was 12760 (+/-24554). Setting: Data were collected at an outpatient AIDS clinic in Texas. Name of Variables or Concept: HIV-related symptoms, health-related quality of life, and CAM therapy use. Measures/Instruments: This study sample completed an assessment packet that included sociodemographic data, Survey of Complementary Therapies, Sign and Symptom Checklist for Persons with HIV Disease, Living with HIV Scale, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36. Findings: Using variables that were either classically demographic (e.g., gender, age) or those that showed significant zero order correlation, a hierarchical regression model was applied. The overall model at the last step explained 11.2% of the variance (F 7,331=5.952, p=0.000). African-Americans used the most CAM therapies, while Hispanics and subjects who perceived themselves as sicker used fewer CAM therapies. The top three CAM treatments identified by rank order of &ldquo;yes&rdquo; responses, percent use, and mean effectiveness were: prayer (n=290, 85.5%), spiritual activities (n=162, 47.8%), and meditation (n=143, 42.2%). Conclusions: African-Americans in this sample used more CAM therapies, while people who perceived themselves as being sicker used fewer non-allopathic interventions. Spirituality and prayer were the most frequently reported CAM therapies used to manage HIV-associated symptoms. Implications: There is clear evidence in the literature about widespread use of these modalities in HIV-infected persons, but evidence-based studies to explore reasons for use and treatment efficacy are still needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:56Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.