Master in Nursing Students’ Experiences as Members of a Virtual Classroom on the Internet

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149415
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Master in Nursing Students’ Experiences as Members of a Virtual Classroom on the Internet
Abstract:
Master in Nursing Students’ Experiences as Members of a Virtual Classroom on the Internet
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Mueller, Carla, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Saint Francis
Title:Associate Professor
There is a growing demand for masters prepared nurses to meet the many health care needs of the population. The rapidly expanding job market for advance practice nurses and the need to continually keep place with the rapid changes in the knowledge base has led an increasing number of nurses to enroll in graduate study. However, adult students find that multiple role responsibilities make it difficult to participate in or appreciate the leisurely pace of the youth-centered model of higher education. Courses in virtual classrooms on the Internet have been established to enable convenient access to graduate nursing education. However, few attempts at systematically investigating and rigorously assessing the experience of graduate students involved in courses in virtual classrooms on the Internet have been published. Disciplined investigation of students' experiences with Internet courses is warranted in order to fully explore the meaning of these experiences to those directly involved. This is a necessary first step in planning appropriate educational strategies for students in this innovative environment. The research questions posed for this study were: How do students in masters in nursing courses experience education as a member of a virtual classroom on the Internet? What meanings do they attach to that experience? A qualitative inquiry using an interpretive phenomonologic design was used to conduct this study. The participants for this study were drawn from those masters in nursing students at a large Midwestern university who were currently enrolled in their first course on the Internet or who had completed their first Internet course within the past year. Network (snowball) sampling was used to select fifteen participants for this study. Fifteen participants were interviewed in two in-depth face-to-face interviews. Participants ranged in age from 24-49 with a mean age of 39 years. Eight participants worked full-time, six worked part-time and one was not employed. Data analysis began shortly after data collection commenced and continued during data collection and beyond using according to the seven stages outlined by Diekelmann, Allen, and Tanner. A hermeneutic circle was used to facilitate the process of data analysis, include other voices in the interpretation, identify inaccurate interpretations of the narrative, and clarify analyses. Five themes and one constitutive pattern were identified. Themes were: Changing expectations à Adapting to New Roles, Learning the System à Technology’s Potholes and Pitfalls, Feeling Overburdened, Is Anyone Really Out There à Communicating Without Voices, and Learning as a Growing Experience à Recognizing New Strengths. The constitutive pattern was Learning the Ropes: Finding a Way Through the Forest. Participants described learning as much different than previous experiences in traditional onground classrooms and spent much time learning the technology and adapting to a more student centered, reflective mode of learning. Communicating with others without the benefit of body language and voices was difficult. Most students reported a sense of isolation and a feeling that they did not know their classmates well. Students who participated in chat room sessions described knowing chat group members better than other classmates and perceived less isolation from other students. This research provides information to help address the needs of students enrolled in graduate nursing courses in the virtual classroom on the Internet. Faculty can improve the experience of graduate nursing students and increase student satisfaction with the Internet as a mode of course delivery by using information gleaned from this exploration of their experiences. Future research needs to identify whether desired outcomes have been achieved and which teaching-learning practices produce the best results in the virtual classroom.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaster in Nursing Students’ Experiences as Members of a Virtual Classroom on the Interneten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149415-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Master in Nursing Students&rsquo; Experiences as Members of a Virtual Classroom on the Internet</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mueller, Carla, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Saint Francis</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmueller@sf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There is a growing demand for masters prepared nurses to meet the many health care needs of the population. The rapidly expanding job market for advance practice nurses and the need to continually keep place with the rapid changes in the knowledge base has led an increasing number of nurses to enroll in graduate study. However, adult students find that multiple role responsibilities make it difficult to participate in or appreciate the leisurely pace of the youth-centered model of higher education. Courses in virtual classrooms on the Internet have been established to enable convenient access to graduate nursing education. However, few attempts at systematically investigating and rigorously assessing the experience of graduate students involved in courses in virtual classrooms on the Internet have been published. Disciplined investigation of students' experiences with Internet courses is warranted in order to fully explore the meaning of these experiences to those directly involved. This is a necessary first step in planning appropriate educational strategies for students in this innovative environment. The research questions posed for this study were: How do students in masters in nursing courses experience education as a member of a virtual classroom on the Internet? What meanings do they attach to that experience? A qualitative inquiry using an interpretive phenomonologic design was used to conduct this study. The participants for this study were drawn from those masters in nursing students at a large Midwestern university who were currently enrolled in their first course on the Internet or who had completed their first Internet course within the past year. Network (snowball) sampling was used to select fifteen participants for this study. Fifteen participants were interviewed in two in-depth face-to-face interviews. Participants ranged in age from 24-49 with a mean age of 39 years. Eight participants worked full-time, six worked part-time and one was not employed. Data analysis began shortly after data collection commenced and continued during data collection and beyond using according to the seven stages outlined by Diekelmann, Allen, and Tanner. A hermeneutic circle was used to facilitate the process of data analysis, include other voices in the interpretation, identify inaccurate interpretations of the narrative, and clarify analyses. Five themes and one constitutive pattern were identified. Themes were: Changing expectations &agrave; Adapting to New Roles, Learning the System &agrave; Technology&rsquo;s Potholes and Pitfalls, Feeling Overburdened, Is Anyone Really Out There &agrave; Communicating Without Voices, and Learning as a Growing Experience &agrave; Recognizing New Strengths. The constitutive pattern was Learning the Ropes: Finding a Way Through the Forest. Participants described learning as much different than previous experiences in traditional onground classrooms and spent much time learning the technology and adapting to a more student centered, reflective mode of learning. Communicating with others without the benefit of body language and voices was difficult. Most students reported a sense of isolation and a feeling that they did not know their classmates well. Students who participated in chat room sessions described knowing chat group members better than other classmates and perceived less isolation from other students. This research provides information to help address the needs of students enrolled in graduate nursing courses in the virtual classroom on the Internet. Faculty can improve the experience of graduate nursing students and increase student satisfaction with the Internet as a mode of course delivery by using information gleaned from this exploration of their experiences. Future research needs to identify whether desired outcomes have been achieved and which teaching-learning practices produce the best results in the virtual classroom.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:57Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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