Access to African-American Elders with Dementia: Challenges to Recruitment in Urban Nursing Homes and Assisted Living

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149417
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Access to African-American Elders with Dementia: Challenges to Recruitment in Urban Nursing Homes and Assisted Living
Abstract:
Access to African-American Elders with Dementia: Challenges to Recruitment in Urban Nursing Homes and Assisted Living
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Barnes, Susan, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Oklahoma Health Science Center
Title:
Objective: While the Federal Government mandates the inclusion of minority subjects in federally funded research, and practical guidelines exist to help researchers fulfill this requirement, there is a gulf between the expectation and the reality of minority recruitment. Beyond regulatory requirements, it is critical that African-American subjects with dementia be included in dementia research so that our conclusions about dementia in this racial minority are sound and data-based, rather than generalized from outcomes of research with primarily Caucasian subjects. The objective of this paper is to identify the unique challenges of conducting research with demented subjects living both in the community and in residential facilities in urban environments. Strategies for maximizing participation from African-American families and their relatives with Dementia will be presented. Findings: In many urban nursing homes and assisted living facilities research is often unfamiliar activity. Thus there are limitations in knowledge, attitudes and behavior surrounding research and activities required to ensure the ethical and efficient conduct of studies. Yet urban nursing homes and assisted living facilities frequently have higher proportions of African-American residents than nursing homes in non-urban environments and offer a rich subject pool. Factors such as the ownership of the facility, union statue of employees, the racial composition of the administrative and staff pools, attitudes towards the researcher, the composition of the research team and the proposed research topic itself can create challenges. Complex education, mental health and medical history requirements for research with residents with dementia impose further limitations on eligible subject numbers. Conclusions: Insight regarding the complex historical, social and organizational factors that can mitigate against minority participation is essential to success with dementia research n urban residential facilities. The identification of key partners, cultivation of a climate of trust and collaboration, a transparent research process and the willingness to work through issues in a non-confrontational way when they arise are all critical to participation. Implications: Without attention to the issues identified above, access to, and successful recruitment of, the demented African-American resident will be compromised. Justice demands that we be committed to negotiating these research issues well.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAccess to African-American Elders with Dementia: Challenges to Recruitment in Urban Nursing Homes and Assisted Livingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149417-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Access to African-American Elders with Dementia: Challenges to Recruitment in Urban Nursing Homes and Assisted Living</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barnes, Susan, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Oklahoma Health Science Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susan-barnes@ouhsc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: While the Federal Government mandates the inclusion of minority subjects in federally funded research, and practical guidelines exist to help researchers fulfill this requirement, there is a gulf between the expectation and the reality of minority recruitment. Beyond regulatory requirements, it is critical that African-American subjects with dementia be included in dementia research so that our conclusions about dementia in this racial minority are sound and data-based, rather than generalized from outcomes of research with primarily Caucasian subjects. The objective of this paper is to identify the unique challenges of conducting research with demented subjects living both in the community and in residential facilities in urban environments. Strategies for maximizing participation from African-American families and their relatives with Dementia will be presented. Findings: In many urban nursing homes and assisted living facilities research is often unfamiliar activity. Thus there are limitations in knowledge, attitudes and behavior surrounding research and activities required to ensure the ethical and efficient conduct of studies. Yet urban nursing homes and assisted living facilities frequently have higher proportions of African-American residents than nursing homes in non-urban environments and offer a rich subject pool. Factors such as the ownership of the facility, union statue of employees, the racial composition of the administrative and staff pools, attitudes towards the researcher, the composition of the research team and the proposed research topic itself can create challenges. Complex education, mental health and medical history requirements for research with residents with dementia impose further limitations on eligible subject numbers. Conclusions: Insight regarding the complex historical, social and organizational factors that can mitigate against minority participation is essential to success with dementia research n urban residential facilities. The identification of key partners, cultivation of a climate of trust and collaboration, a transparent research process and the willingness to work through issues in a non-confrontational way when they arise are all critical to participation. Implications: Without attention to the issues identified above, access to, and successful recruitment of, the demented African-American resident will be compromised. Justice demands that we be committed to negotiating these research issues well.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:02:00Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:02:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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