2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149420
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal Coping with Childhood Cancer
Abstract:
Maternal Coping with Childhood Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Han, Hae-Ra
P.I. Institution Name:Johns Hopkins University
Objective: To identify significant factors that influence coping with childhood cancer and coping outcomes in Korean mothers who have a child diagnosed as having cancer. Design: A correlational cross-sectional design with multivariate analysis. Sample: 200 Korean mothers of children with cancer who are undergoing cancer treatment. Setting: In- and out-patient clinics for pediatric oncology patients in three general hospitals, Seoul, Korea. Names of Variables or Concept: Stress, illness-related (time since diagnosis and recurrences of cancer) and demographic (maternal age) factors, social support, coping, and coping outcomes. Measures/Instruments: Family Inventory of Life Events and Changes (FILE), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for maternal stress, Coping Health Inventory for Parents (CHIP), Personal Resource Questionnaire (PRQ)-Part 2, Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale (PAIS), and selected demographic and illness-related questions. Findings: The results of this study identified several factors that significantly influence maternal coping and coping outcomes. One of the important findings is the association of a pile-up of events with maternal coping and coping outcomes, which has not been empirically validated in parents of children with cancer. Although the moderating effect was not supported, the significant role of social support in mitigating the potential for psychosocial problems and in facilitating coping was substantiated by testing the direct effect. A number of culture-specific findings were also noted. Conclusions: While previous psychosocial research involving an American sample has reported the appropriateness of the stress-coping framework in explaining parental responses to childhood chronic diseases such as cancer, this study confirms the usefulness of the stress-coping approach with a sample of Korean mothers. Future research efforts will include a variety of cultural groups addressing gaps in current coping research in parents of children with cancer. Implications: Several implications for practice and research were identified. For practice, nurses need to assess each person for spiritual needs, assist the whole family with stress reduction and adaptation, enhance social support, and extend their knowledge on coping to include diverse groups of families. For research, inclusion of whole system of the family is expected to provide invaluable sources for planning nursing interventions that can have more positive influences on families’ coping with childhood cancer. In addition, future research needs to examine the coping process over the life span of the family. Another implication is that the data can be strengthened through qualitative study of the lived-experience of parents by examining parental behaviors and reactions within specific familial, medical, or cultural contexts. Lastly, while some cultural aspects needed to be considered in interpreting the data, more efforts are necessary to find out how cultural conceptions affect coping process.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal Coping with Childhood Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149420-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal Coping with Childhood Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Han, Hae-Ra</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Johns Hopkins University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hhan@son.jhmi.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To identify significant factors that influence coping with childhood cancer and coping outcomes in Korean mothers who have a child diagnosed as having cancer. Design: A correlational cross-sectional design with multivariate analysis. Sample: 200 Korean mothers of children with cancer who are undergoing cancer treatment. Setting: In- and out-patient clinics for pediatric oncology patients in three general hospitals, Seoul, Korea. Names of Variables or Concept: Stress, illness-related (time since diagnosis and recurrences of cancer) and demographic (maternal age) factors, social support, coping, and coping outcomes. Measures/Instruments: Family Inventory of Life Events and Changes (FILE), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for maternal stress, Coping Health Inventory for Parents (CHIP), Personal Resource Questionnaire (PRQ)-Part 2, Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale (PAIS), and selected demographic and illness-related questions. Findings: The results of this study identified several factors that significantly influence maternal coping and coping outcomes. One of the important findings is the association of a pile-up of events with maternal coping and coping outcomes, which has not been empirically validated in parents of children with cancer. Although the moderating effect was not supported, the significant role of social support in mitigating the potential for psychosocial problems and in facilitating coping was substantiated by testing the direct effect. A number of culture-specific findings were also noted. Conclusions: While previous psychosocial research involving an American sample has reported the appropriateness of the stress-coping framework in explaining parental responses to childhood chronic diseases such as cancer, this study confirms the usefulness of the stress-coping approach with a sample of Korean mothers. Future research efforts will include a variety of cultural groups addressing gaps in current coping research in parents of children with cancer. Implications: Several implications for practice and research were identified. For practice, nurses need to assess each person for spiritual needs, assist the whole family with stress reduction and adaptation, enhance social support, and extend their knowledge on coping to include diverse groups of families. For research, inclusion of whole system of the family is expected to provide invaluable sources for planning nursing interventions that can have more positive influences on families&rsquo; coping with childhood cancer. In addition, future research needs to examine the coping process over the life span of the family. Another implication is that the data can be strengthened through qualitative study of the lived-experience of parents by examining parental behaviors and reactions within specific familial, medical, or cultural contexts. Lastly, while some cultural aspects needed to be considered in interpreting the data, more efforts are necessary to find out how cultural conceptions affect coping process.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:02:04Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:02:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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