Caring attitudes, perception of workload, and burnout in nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149421
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caring attitudes, perception of workload, and burnout in nursing
Abstract:
Caring attitudes, perception of workload, and burnout in nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Moffett, Barbara
P.I. Institution Name:Southeastern Louisiana University
Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between caring attitudes and burnout in nursing, considering perceptions of increased workload. Design: A descriptive, cross-sectional correlational design was used to collect data concerning caring attitudes, components of burnout, workload perceptions, and demographic information. Sample: A current list of registered nurses indicating employment as a staff nurse was obtained from the State Board of Nursing of a southern state. A random sample of 350 nurses employed full-time were asked to participate in the study by completing survey instruments. A total of 198 responses were received and utilized in the study, for a response rate of 56.6%. Variables: Variables in the study included affective (attitudinal) caring, components of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, lack of personal accomplishment), and perception of workload changes in the last 2 years. Measures/ Instruments: The Caring Inventory: Nurse Form (CI-N) was used to measure caring attitudes. This instrument has been used in several prior studies and evidence of construct validity has been established. Cronbach’s Alpha established internal consistency reliability in this study at .87. Burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), consisting of 3 subscales: Emotional Exhaustion (EE), Depersonalization (DP), and Personal Accomplishment (PA). Validity and reliability have been studied extensively in numerous prior studies. Internal consistency reliability in this study was consistent with those previously established. Cronbach’s Alpha for each of the subscales were as follows: Emotional Exhaustion, .92, Depersonalization, .82, Personal Accomplishment. .76. Findings: A significant negative correlation was found between scores on the CI-N and the (EE) and (DP) subscales of the MBI. There was a significant positive correlation between the CI-N and the PA subscale of the MBI. Using linear regression, caring accounted for 17% of the variance in scores on emotional exhaustion and 37% of the variance in scores on Personal Accomplishment. Perception of changes in workload over the last two years was significantly correlated with the EE and DP subscales of the MBI. No relationship was found between caring and perception of workload. Nurses in acute care settings were found to perceive the greatest increase in workload over the last 2 years. Conclusions: Results of this study support the conclusion that caring attitudes can serve as a mediator of burnout in nurses and enhances the feeling of personal accomplishment. Implications: Activities that promote development of caring attitudes in nurses may serve to enhance retention of nurses by decreasing the incidence of burnout. There may also be implications for selection procedures both in employment of nurses and selection of students entering nursing programs. Further research is suggested to study the stability of caring attitudes over time and the long-term relationship between caring and burnout.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaring attitudes, perception of workload, and burnout in nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149421-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Caring attitudes, perception of workload, and burnout in nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moffett, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southeastern Louisiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bmoffett@selu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between caring attitudes and burnout in nursing, considering perceptions of increased workload. Design: A descriptive, cross-sectional correlational design was used to collect data concerning caring attitudes, components of burnout, workload perceptions, and demographic information. Sample: A current list of registered nurses indicating employment as a staff nurse was obtained from the State Board of Nursing of a southern state. A random sample of 350 nurses employed full-time were asked to participate in the study by completing survey instruments. A total of 198 responses were received and utilized in the study, for a response rate of 56.6%. Variables: Variables in the study included affective (attitudinal) caring, components of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, lack of personal accomplishment), and perception of workload changes in the last 2 years. Measures/ Instruments: The Caring Inventory: Nurse Form (CI-N) was used to measure caring attitudes. This instrument has been used in several prior studies and evidence of construct validity has been established. Cronbach&rsquo;s Alpha established internal consistency reliability in this study at .87. Burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), consisting of 3 subscales: Emotional Exhaustion (EE), Depersonalization (DP), and Personal Accomplishment (PA). Validity and reliability have been studied extensively in numerous prior studies. Internal consistency reliability in this study was consistent with those previously established. Cronbach&rsquo;s Alpha for each of the subscales were as follows: Emotional Exhaustion, .92, Depersonalization, .82, Personal Accomplishment. .76. Findings: A significant negative correlation was found between scores on the CI-N and the (EE) and (DP) subscales of the MBI. There was a significant positive correlation between the CI-N and the PA subscale of the MBI. Using linear regression, caring accounted for 17% of the variance in scores on emotional exhaustion and 37% of the variance in scores on Personal Accomplishment. Perception of changes in workload over the last two years was significantly correlated with the EE and DP subscales of the MBI. No relationship was found between caring and perception of workload. Nurses in acute care settings were found to perceive the greatest increase in workload over the last 2 years. Conclusions: Results of this study support the conclusion that caring attitudes can serve as a mediator of burnout in nurses and enhances the feeling of personal accomplishment. Implications: Activities that promote development of caring attitudes in nurses may serve to enhance retention of nurses by decreasing the incidence of burnout. There may also be implications for selection procedures both in employment of nurses and selection of students entering nursing programs. Further research is suggested to study the stability of caring attitudes over time and the long-term relationship between caring and burnout.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:02:05Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:02:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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