Exploring Symptoms at the End-of-Life in the High-Risk Neonate in the NICU

9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149428
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Symptoms at the End-of-Life in the High-Risk Neonate in the NICU
Abstract:
Exploring Symptoms at the End-of-Life in the High-Risk Neonate in the NICU
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Fortney, Christine A., RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:The Ohio State University
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Co-Authors:Deborah K. Steward, PhD, RN
[Invited Poster or Paper Session] Advances in the management of high-risk deliveries have significantly contributed to an increase in the numbers of neonates confronting prematurity, congenital anomalies, or other syndromes who survive the initial delivery resuscitation, and are admitted to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Once in the NICU, the management of these neonates is focused on stabilization and survival, however for many neonates it becomes apparent that, despite all of the tremendous technical capabilities available to manage neonatal illness, treatment becomes futile and death is inevitable. The majority of deaths in the NICU are attributed to withdrawal of treatment. Once the decision is made to withdraw or withhold treatment, the emphasis must turn to managing the end-of-life (EOL) process. Unfortunately, EOL care for neonates in the NICU has received very little attention from a research perspective. Empirical evidence is lacking that characterizes the signs and symptoms the dying neonate exhibits, along with treatment strategies that are used. Because neonates cannot speak, they provide cues which must then be identified and interpreted. The effectiveness of the cues exhibited by the neonate; the capacity of the caregiver to interpret the cues correctly; and the caregiver?s knowledge of normal neurodevelopment and pathophysiology, as well as their experience and intuition impact the recognition of symptoms. Accurate evaluation of the dying neonate can be further hindered because the neonate might exhibit few obvious cues. The purpose of this study was to examine the end-of-life course of several neonates and the observations of physicians, nurse practitioners and staff nurses in order to characterize the physical and behavioral signs and symptoms exhibited at the end of life. Further, the study identified the treatment strategies used to manage those signs and symptoms. The results of the study will be shared.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Symptoms at the End-of-Life in the High-Risk Neonate in the NICUen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149428-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring Symptoms at the End-of-Life in the High-Risk Neonate in the NICU</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fortney, Christine A., RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fortney.19@osu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah K. Steward, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Invited Poster or Paper Session] Advances in the management of high-risk deliveries have significantly contributed to an increase in the numbers of neonates confronting prematurity, congenital anomalies, or other syndromes who survive the initial delivery resuscitation, and are admitted to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Once in the NICU, the management of these neonates is focused on stabilization and survival, however for many neonates it becomes apparent that, despite all of the tremendous technical capabilities available to manage neonatal illness, treatment becomes futile and death is inevitable. The majority of deaths in the NICU are attributed to withdrawal of treatment. Once the decision is made to withdraw or withhold treatment, the emphasis must turn to managing the end-of-life (EOL) process. Unfortunately, EOL care for neonates in the NICU has received very little attention from a research perspective. Empirical evidence is lacking that characterizes the signs and symptoms the dying neonate exhibits,&nbsp;along with&nbsp;treatment strategies that are used. Because neonates cannot speak, they provide cues which must then be identified and interpreted. The effectiveness of the cues exhibited by the neonate; the capacity of the caregiver to interpret the cues correctly; and the caregiver?s knowledge of normal neurodevelopment and pathophysiology, as well as their experience and intuition impact the recognition of&nbsp;symptoms. Accurate evaluation of the dying neonate can be further hindered because the neonate might exhibit few obvious cues. The purpose of this study was to examine the end-of-life course of several neonates and the observations of physicians, nurse practitioners and staff nurses in order to characterize the physical and behavioral signs and symptoms exhibited at the end of life. Further, the study identified the treatment strategies used to manage those signs and symptoms. The results of the study will be shared.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:02:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:02:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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