A Pilot Qualitative Study to Explore Middle-Aged Women's Perceptions of Recovery Following a Myocardial Infarction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149436
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Pilot Qualitative Study to Explore Middle-Aged Women's Perceptions of Recovery Following a Myocardial Infarction
Abstract:
A Pilot Qualitative Study to Explore Middle-Aged Women's Perceptions of Recovery Following a Myocardial Infarction
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Haedtke, Christine, RN, PCCN
P.I. Institution Name:Gundersen Lutheran Health System
Title:Staff Nurse
Co-Authors:Ana Schaper, PhD
[Scientific Session Presentation] Background/Purpose: Life Transition Theory (LTT) identifies the processes a person uses to reduce uncertainty following a critical event.  Nurses can use LTT to assess what strategies patients are using to cope with life changes. Because old coping strategies often do not work during a life transition experience, the nurse can assist patients in implementing new skills and strategies supporting a successful transition.  The applicability of LTT to women following myocardial infarction (MI) has not been tested. As part of a pilot study designed to help women manage fatigue following MI, women were interviewed to explore their recovery experiences and assess the utility of LTT in defining this experience.Method: Ten women (age 48 to 59) were interviewed at 1, 6 and 12 weeks after their MI. Interviews, using open-ended questions, were conducted at the women?s home and audio-taped. Interviews were transcribed verbatim without identifying information. LTT was used to guide the analysis.Result: Women?s stories centered on the need to maintain their view of self as active, productive women. Women sorted out the cause of their MI recognizing the role of traditional risk factors, but highlighting stress. In the first interview, women verbalized importance of lifestyle changes and expected to be back to normal at three months. At three months, women changed their diets, stopped smoking, but were struggling to manage stress and find time for exercise. Conclusion: Understanding life transitions can give nurses a framework to counsel women. Maintaining a productive self-image was a defining feature of women?s experiences. Women?s need for productivity existed in conflict with their goals of self-care. Nurses can explore this conflict with women, provide options for reframing self-care as productive activity, and teach strategies to integrate stress management and exercise into daily life activities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Pilot Qualitative Study to Explore Middle-Aged Women's Perceptions of Recovery Following a Myocardial Infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149436-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Pilot Qualitative Study to Explore Middle-Aged Women's Perceptions of Recovery Following a Myocardial Infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Haedtke, Christine, RN, PCCN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Gundersen Lutheran Health System</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cahaedtk@gundluth.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ana Schaper, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] Background/Purpose: Life Transition Theory (LTT) identifies the processes a person uses to reduce uncertainty following a critical event. &nbsp;Nurses can use LTT to assess what strategies patients are using to cope with life changes. Because old coping strategies often do not work during a life transition experience, the nurse can assist patients in implementing new skills and strategies supporting a successful transition.&nbsp; The applicability of LTT to women following myocardial infarction (MI) has not been tested. As part of a pilot study designed to help women manage fatigue following MI, women were interviewed to explore their recovery experiences and assess the utility of LTT in defining this experience.Method: Ten women (age 48 to 59) were interviewed at 1, 6 and 12 weeks after their MI. Interviews, using open-ended questions, were conducted at the women?s home and audio-taped. Interviews were transcribed verbatim without identifying information. LTT was used to guide the analysis.Result: Women?s stories centered on the need to maintain their view of self as active, productive women. Women sorted out the cause of their MI recognizing the role of traditional risk factors, but highlighting stress. In the first interview, women verbalized importance of lifestyle changes and expected to be back to normal at three months. At three months, women changed their diets, stopped smoking, but were struggling to manage stress and find time for exercise. Conclusion: Understanding life transitions can give nurses a framework to counsel women. Maintaining a productive self-image was a defining feature of women?s experiences. Women?s need for productivity existed in conflict with their goals of self-care. Nurses can explore this conflict with women, provide options for reframing self-care as productive activity, and teach strategies to integrate stress management and exercise into&nbsp;daily life activities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:02:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:02:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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