Explicating Global Wellbeing in Adolescents Transitioning into Adulthood Using Health Risk Behaviors and Adjustment to College

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149461
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Explicating Global Wellbeing in Adolescents Transitioning into Adulthood Using Health Risk Behaviors and Adjustment to College
Abstract:
Explicating Global Wellbeing in Adolescents Transitioning into Adulthood Using Health Risk Behaviors and Adjustment to College
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:McDermott, Jeanine S., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northland Community and Technical College
Title:Nursing Instructor
[Scientific Session Presentation] Health risk behaviors (binge drinking, unsafe driving, unprotected sex) are often established in adolescence, extend into adulthood, and negatively impact wellbeing. Little research exists associating behaviors with perceptions of wellness. Baseline knowledge of how young adults? life-style choices and behaviors influence their sense of wellness is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of wellness-oriented interventions. The purpose of this study was to explicate global wellbeing in 18-24 year old college students by identifying influential factors. Adam?s Multiple Dimensions of Perceived Wellness guided this descriptive study. Recruited subjects (N = 281) from randomly selected entry-level courses at a medium-sized university completed a customized survey.  Descriptive analysis was presented for the 21 independent variables. Inferential analysis included ANOVAs, correlations, and multiple regressions.Global wellbeing correlated with students? mental health risk (r = -.402; p = .01), academic performance (r = -.267; p = .01), and adjustment to college (r = .165; p = .01). Stepwise regression explained 24.3% variability in global wellbeing by the single indexed variable: mental health risk (R2 = .243; p <.001; ANOVA: F (1, 249) = 72.139; p < .001; Beta = -.474; t (249) = -8.493; p <.001). Mental health risk also correlated with students? health risk behaviors (r = .322; p = .01), and academic performance (r = .620; p = .01). The only other variable that correlated with students? health risk behaviors was academic performance (r = .433; p = .01).Mental health needs are integral with students? health risk behaviors, academic performance, and global wellbeing. Wellbeing is a holistic perceptual construct. Focusing wellness efforts on areas of choice can improve wellness dimensionally and globally. Assessing global wellbeing and health risks simultaneously can guide the appropriate level of intervention by identifying at-risk students. These practices could provide the foundation for evidence-based health promotion and wellness programs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExplicating Global Wellbeing in Adolescents Transitioning into Adulthood Using Health Risk Behaviors and Adjustment to Collegeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149461-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Explicating Global Wellbeing in Adolescents Transitioning into Adulthood Using Health Risk Behaviors and Adjustment to College</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McDermott, Jeanine S., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northland Community and Technical College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jeanine.mcdermott@northlandcollege.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] Health risk behaviors (binge drinking, unsafe driving, unprotected sex) are often established in adolescence, extend into adulthood, and negatively impact wellbeing. Little research exists associating behaviors with perceptions of wellness. Baseline knowledge of how young adults? life-style choices and behaviors influence their sense of wellness is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of wellness-oriented interventions. The purpose of this study was to explicate global wellbeing in 18-24 year old college students by identifying influential factors. Adam?s Multiple Dimensions of Perceived Wellness guided this descriptive study. Recruited subjects (N = 281) from randomly selected entry-level courses at a medium-sized university completed a customized survey. &nbsp;Descriptive analysis was presented for the 21 independent variables. Inferential analysis included ANOVAs, correlations, and multiple regressions.Global wellbeing correlated with students? mental health risk (r = -.402; p = .01), academic performance (r = -.267; p = .01), and adjustment to college (r = .165; p = .01). Stepwise regression explained 24.3% variability in global wellbeing by the single indexed variable: mental health risk (R2 = .243; p &lt;.001; ANOVA: F (1, 249) = 72.139; p &lt; .001; Beta = -.474; t (249) = -8.493; p &lt;.001). Mental health risk also correlated with students? health risk behaviors (r = .322; p = .01), and academic performance (r = .620; p = .01). The only other variable that correlated with students? health risk behaviors was academic performance (r = .433; p = .01).Mental health needs are integral with students? health risk behaviors, academic performance, and global wellbeing. Wellbeing is a holistic perceptual construct. Focusing wellness efforts on areas of choice can improve wellness dimensionally and globally. Assessing global wellbeing and health risks simultaneously can guide the appropriate level of intervention by identifying at-risk students. These practices could provide the foundation for evidence-based health promotion and wellness programs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:02:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:02:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.