Internationally Adopted Children: Healthcare Needs and APN Responses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149470
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Internationally Adopted Children: Healthcare Needs and APN Responses
Abstract:
Internationally Adopted Children: Healthcare Needs and APN Responses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Murphy, Natalie L., BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Florida Atlantic University
Title:BSN to PhD student
[Invited Poster or Paper Session] Internationally adopted children come from dire conditions of social and economic adversity. As a result, many of the children suffer neglect and deprivation, which may result in long-term health consequences. Although the requirement for obtaining a resident visa for the United States does include a medical examination, this is simply a cursory assessment. This limited screening is designed to protect the public from a few specific conditions and does not determine if the children are completely healthy. Consequently, many of the adopted children arrive to their new home with acute and chronic infectious diseases as well as other significant medical problems and developmental delays.Since medical needs and risks of international adoptees can be extensive, nurses need to be familiar with these challenges and screen the adopted children appropriately. To provide quality care, advanced practice nurses caring for internationally adopted children need to be familiar with best practice recommendations suggested by experts in the emerging field of international adoption medicine. With proper screening, these children can safely begin to grow and excel, supported by the love and care of their new families. Additionally, with proper screening, their adopted families and the public can be protected from contracting infectious diseases. Despite an underprivileged beginning, internationally adopted children are resilient. Although developmental delays are prevalent in this population, these children rapidly catch up to their non-adopted peers. Advanced practice nurses can be instrumental in supporting this success.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInternationally Adopted Children: Healthcare Needs and APN Responsesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149470-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Internationally Adopted Children: Healthcare Needs and APN Responses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Murphy, Natalie L., BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida Atlantic University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">BSN to PhD student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nmurphy3@fau.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Invited Poster or Paper Session] Internationally adopted children come from dire conditions of social and economic adversity. As a result, many of the children suffer neglect and deprivation, which may result in long-term health consequences. Although the requirement for obtaining a resident visa for the United States does include a medical examination, this is simply a cursory assessment. This limited screening is designed to protect the public from a few specific conditions and does not determine if the children are completely healthy. Consequently, many of the adopted children arrive to their new home with acute and chronic infectious diseases as well as other significant medical problems and developmental delays.Since medical needs and risks of international adoptees can be extensive, nurses need to be familiar with these challenges and screen the adopted children appropriately. To provide quality care, advanced practice nurses caring for internationally adopted children need to be familiar with best practice recommendations suggested by experts in the emerging field of international adoption medicine. With proper screening, these children can safely begin to grow and excel, supported by the love and care of their new families. Additionally, with proper screening, their adopted families and the public can be protected from contracting infectious diseases. Despite an underprivileged beginning, internationally adopted children are resilient. Although developmental delays are prevalent in this population, these children rapidly catch up to their non-adopted peers. Advanced practice nurses can be instrumental in supporting this success.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:03:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:03:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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