2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149501
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Condom Use in Women Survivors of Sexual Victimization
Abstract:
Condom Use in Women Survivors of Sexual Victimization
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Sullivan, Jessica M., BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Title:Graduate Student
Co-Authors:Caroline Mallory, PhD, RN
[Invited Poster or Paper Session] Women constitute the fastest growing population of new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. From 1985 to 2005, the proportion of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cases among women increased from 8% to 27%, with heterosexual contact accounting for 80% of new HIV diagnoses. Women with a history of sexual victimization are at an increased risk for contracting HIV due to higher rates of alcohol and drug abuse and a greater frequency of sexual risk-taking behaviors than their non-victimized counterparts. Behavioral HIV prevention interventions for women have become critical in the effort to curb HIV transmission. Many of these interventions include male condom skills training and promotion aimed at increasing condom use intentions and condom self-efficacy (CSE). In order to design and implement successful HIV prevention interventions for women survivors of sexual abuse, understanding the attitudes, personal histories, and social environments of these women is imperative. Overall, researchers agree that several factors, such as employment, income status, and age, have an effect on women?s CSE. While several studies have shown the success of HIV prevention interventions in women in general, few studies have specifically addressed the effects of HIV prevention interventions on the CSE of women with a history of sexual victimization. The purposes of this study are to explore the relationship between condom self-efficacy and sexual victimization in women and to determine if the Women First! HIV Prevention Intervention increases condom self-efficacy in women with a history of sexual victimization.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCondom Use in Women Survivors of Sexual Victimizationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149501-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Condom Use in Women Survivors of Sexual Victimization</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sullivan, Jessica M., BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmsull2@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Caroline Mallory, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Invited Poster or Paper Session] Women constitute the fastest growing population of new cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. From 1985 to 2005, the proportion of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cases among women increased from 8% to 27%, with heterosexual contact accounting for 80% of new HIV diagnoses. Women with a history of sexual victimization are at an increased risk for contracting HIV due to higher rates of alcohol and drug abuse and a greater frequency of sexual risk-taking behaviors than their non-victimized counterparts. Behavioral HIV prevention interventions for women have become critical in the effort to curb HIV transmission. Many of these interventions include male condom skills training and promotion aimed at increasing condom use intentions and condom self-efficacy (CSE). In order to design and implement successful HIV prevention interventions for women survivors of sexual abuse, understanding the attitudes, personal histories, and social environments of these women is imperative. Overall, researchers agree that several factors, such as employment, income status, and age, have an effect on women?s CSE. While several studies have shown the success of HIV prevention interventions in women in general, few studies have specifically addressed the effects of HIV prevention interventions on the CSE of women with a history of sexual victimization. The purposes of this study are to explore the relationship between condom self-efficacy and sexual victimization in women and to determine if the Women First! HIV Prevention Intervention increases condom self-efficacy in women with a history of sexual victimization.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:03:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:03:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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