2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149514
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Student Perceptions of Critical Thinking
Abstract:
Nursing Student Perceptions of Critical Thinking
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Walsh, Susan A., RN, MN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Georgia State University
Title:Doctoral Student
Co-Authors:Ptlene Minick, PhD
[Leadership Session Presentation] The belief that critical thinking (CT) is integral to what nurses do has made the concept an essential nursing attribute and an expected outcome for nursing curricula. Though few would argue the value of CT ability in nurses, nursing education programs show mixed results in improving student CT over the course of a curriculum. Lack of a consensus definition for CT, lack of clear understanding of the concept, and evidence that CT is difficult to teach and learn may all contribute to variable CT outcomes.After IRB approval was obtained, a qualitative design was used to examine nursing student perceptions of CT in clinical settings. In-depth individual interviews with a purposive sample of nine BSN students were conducted. Analysis consisted of coding, categorizing and identifying themes. Major themes included, a) Tools for CT are knowledge, situational information, experience, and caring; b). Experience can be borrowed from nurse colleagues, and c) At times, asking questions did not seem acceptable.Students expressed concern with making mistakes which could harm their patients and about being judged for asking questions. Students believed that clinical practice of CT was necessary to gain experience, and while modeling was important, so was hands on CT and decision making which was made possible when they had the necessary tools.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Student Perceptions of Critical Thinkingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149514-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Student Perceptions of Critical Thinking</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Walsh, Susan A., RN, MN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgia State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susanwalsh@clayton.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ptlene Minick, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Leadership Session Presentation] The belief that critical thinking (CT) is integral to what nurses do has made the concept an essential nursing attribute and an expected outcome for nursing curricula. Though few would argue the value of CT ability in nurses, nursing education programs show mixed results in improving student CT over the course of a curriculum. Lack of a consensus definition for CT, lack of clear understanding of the concept, and evidence that CT is difficult to teach and learn may all contribute to variable CT outcomes.After IRB approval was obtained, a qualitative design was used to examine nursing student perceptions of CT in clinical settings. In-depth individual interviews with a purposive sample of nine BSN students were conducted. Analysis consisted of coding, categorizing and identifying themes. Major themes included, a) Tools for CT are knowledge, situational information, experience, and caring; b). Experience can be borrowed from nurse colleagues, and c) At times, asking questions did not seem acceptable.Students expressed concern with making mistakes which could harm their patients and about being judged for asking questions. Students believed that clinical practice of CT was necessary to gain experience, and while modeling was important, so was hands on CT and decision making which was made possible when they had the necessary tools.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:03:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:03:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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