2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149528
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors related to temperament in low birthweight infants
Abstract:
Factors related to temperament in low birthweight infants
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Gennaro, Susan, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania
Title:Associate Professor
Increasing technologic advances in neonatal intensive care units

have greatly decreased mortality and morbidity of the preterm low

birthweight (LBW) infant. However, the report of difficult

temperament in LBW infants for at least the first six months of

life corrected age remains constant. Parents often describe

their infants as difficult to soothe, arrhythmical in body

function, and negative in mood. Yet, what has eluded researchers

is the ability to predict this behavioral style. If difficult

temperament could be more accurately predicted, interventions to

help parents care for these difficult infants could be more

accurately targeted. The purpose of this study was to explore

aspects of neonatal morbidity that may influence infant

temperament in three cohorts of infants from different University

hospitals.



Cohort A consisted of 42 preterm LBW infants with a mean length

of hospital stay (LOS) of 55 days, a mean of 9 days on mechanical

ventilation, an average birthweight of 1203 grams and 1 infant

with an intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) greater than Grade II.

Cohort B was comprised of 45 preterm LBW infants with a mean LOS

of 45 days, a mean of 9 days on mechanical ventilation, a mean

birthweight of 1447 grams, with 5 infants with an IVH greater

than Grade II. Cohort C had 63 preterm LBW infants with a mean

LOS of 32 days, an average of 7 days on mechanical ventilation, a

mean birthweight of 1637 grams, and with 3 infants with IVH

greater than Grade II.



At 6 months adjusted age the temperaments of infants in these

three cohorts of preterm LBW infants who were born at 7 different

hospitals over three distinct time periods were examined.

Temperament was measured by the Infant Temperament Questionnaire

(ITQ) in Cohort A and B and by the Infant Characteristics

Questionnaire (ICQ) in Cohort C. Both tools have established

reliability and validity, have been used extensively with LBW

infants, and were completed by study mothers. In each cohort

data on LOS, number of days of mechanical ventilation,

birthweight and degree of IVH were obtained from infant medical

records.



In multiple hospitals, at different times, using more than one

measure of temperament no clear pattern of factors related to

difficult temperament emerges. Birthweight was related to some

characteristics of temperament in two cohorts and infants who

were hospitalized and ventilated longer were more difficult in

some dimensions of temperament in one cohort. Although infants

in the study were generally more difficult than comparison groups

of term infants, specific aspects of prematurity that are related

to difficult temperament were not consistent.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors related to temperament in low birthweight infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149528-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors related to temperament in low birthweight infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gennaro, Susan, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gennaro@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Increasing technologic advances in neonatal intensive care units<br/><br/>have greatly decreased mortality and morbidity of the preterm low<br/><br/>birthweight (LBW) infant. However, the report of difficult<br/><br/>temperament in LBW infants for at least the first six months of<br/><br/>life corrected age remains constant. Parents often describe<br/><br/>their infants as difficult to soothe, arrhythmical in body<br/><br/>function, and negative in mood. Yet, what has eluded researchers<br/><br/>is the ability to predict this behavioral style. If difficult<br/><br/>temperament could be more accurately predicted, interventions to<br/><br/>help parents care for these difficult infants could be more<br/><br/>accurately targeted. The purpose of this study was to explore<br/><br/>aspects of neonatal morbidity that may influence infant<br/><br/>temperament in three cohorts of infants from different University<br/><br/>hospitals.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Cohort A consisted of 42 preterm LBW infants with a mean length<br/><br/>of hospital stay (LOS) of 55 days, a mean of 9 days on mechanical<br/><br/>ventilation, an average birthweight of 1203 grams and 1 infant<br/><br/>with an intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) greater than Grade II.<br/><br/>Cohort B was comprised of 45 preterm LBW infants with a mean LOS<br/><br/>of 45 days, a mean of 9 days on mechanical ventilation, a mean<br/><br/>birthweight of 1447 grams, with 5 infants with an IVH greater<br/><br/>than Grade II. Cohort C had 63 preterm LBW infants with a mean<br/><br/>LOS of 32 days, an average of 7 days on mechanical ventilation, a<br/><br/>mean birthweight of 1637 grams, and with 3 infants with IVH<br/><br/>greater than Grade II.<br/><br/><br/><br/>At 6 months adjusted age the temperaments of infants in these<br/><br/>three cohorts of preterm LBW infants who were born at 7 different<br/><br/>hospitals over three distinct time periods were examined.<br/><br/>Temperament was measured by the Infant Temperament Questionnaire<br/><br/>(ITQ) in Cohort A and B and by the Infant Characteristics<br/><br/>Questionnaire (ICQ) in Cohort C. Both tools have established<br/><br/>reliability and validity, have been used extensively with LBW<br/><br/>infants, and were completed by study mothers. In each cohort<br/><br/>data on LOS, number of days of mechanical ventilation,<br/><br/>birthweight and degree of IVH were obtained from infant medical<br/><br/>records.<br/><br/><br/><br/>In multiple hospitals, at different times, using more than one<br/><br/>measure of temperament no clear pattern of factors related to<br/><br/>difficult temperament emerges. Birthweight was related to some<br/><br/>characteristics of temperament in two cohorts and infants who<br/><br/>were hospitalized and ventilated longer were more difficult in<br/><br/>some dimensions of temperament in one cohort. Although infants<br/><br/>in the study were generally more difficult than comparison groups<br/><br/>of term infants, specific aspects of prematurity that are related<br/><br/>to difficult temperament were not consistent.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:04:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:04:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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