Determinants of home versus hospital terminal care in gynecology patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149529
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determinants of home versus hospital terminal care in gynecology patients
Abstract:
Determinants of home versus hospital terminal care in gynecology patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Loesch, Mary, MS/MSc
P.I. Institution Name:University Hospital, SUNY at Stony Brook
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist
The purpose of this study was to analyze patient diagnosis, age at diagnosis, age at death,marital status, insurance coverage and year of death in relation to location of death for gyn-oncology patients. Patients managed by a gyn-oncology service of a tertiary care facility (N=468) from 1980-1990 were organized into two categories, those whose death occurred in the hospital and those whose death occurred at home. The patients ranged in age from 24-93 with a mean age of 65. Diagnoses included endometrial, ovarian, cervical, breast, sarcoma, vulvar and vaginal cancer. A retrospective chart audit was employed to obtain patient data. Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographic data. A direct discriminant function analysis was performed using the variables of age at diagnosis, age at death, and year of death as predictors of membership in the two groups. The hospital was the location of death for 79 percent of the patients with a mean terminal stay of 15 days. Only 89 patients died at home and 14 died in a hospice or nursing home. Correlations between predictor variables and discriminant functions suggest that age of diagnosis, age at death, marital status, insurance coverage, and year of death were not related to the location of death. Examination of the variable year of death shows that the likelihood of death in the hospital generally increased over the period of time from 1980-1990. This finding is particularly interesting in light of a diagnosis related group (DRG) prospective payment program which became effective in this hospital in 1986. This study suggests that gyn-oncology patients are returning to the hospital for terminal care. Factors contributing to this institutionalization of terminal care need to be investigated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeterminants of home versus hospital terminal care in gynecology patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149529-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Determinants of home versus hospital terminal care in gynecology patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Loesch, Mary, MS/MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University Hospital, SUNY at Stony Brook</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to analyze patient diagnosis, age at diagnosis, age at death,marital status, insurance coverage and year of death in relation to location of death for gyn-oncology patients. Patients managed by a gyn-oncology service of a tertiary care facility (N=468) from 1980-1990 were organized into two categories, those whose death occurred in the hospital and those whose death occurred at home. The patients ranged in age from 24-93 with a mean age of 65. Diagnoses included endometrial, ovarian, cervical, breast, sarcoma, vulvar and vaginal cancer. A retrospective chart audit was employed to obtain patient data. Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographic data. A direct discriminant function analysis was performed using the variables of age at diagnosis, age at death, and year of death as predictors of membership in the two groups. The hospital was the location of death for 79 percent of the patients with a mean terminal stay of 15 days. Only 89 patients died at home and 14 died in a hospice or nursing home. Correlations between predictor variables and discriminant functions suggest that age of diagnosis, age at death, marital status, insurance coverage, and year of death were not related to the location of death. Examination of the variable year of death shows that the likelihood of death in the hospital generally increased over the period of time from 1980-1990. This finding is particularly interesting in light of a diagnosis related group (DRG) prospective payment program which became effective in this hospital in 1986. This study suggests that gyn-oncology patients are returning to the hospital for terminal care. Factors contributing to this institutionalization of terminal care need to be investigated.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:04:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:04:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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