Schooling for oppression: The lived experience of the returning RN student

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149530
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Schooling for oppression: The lived experience of the returning RN student
Abstract:
Schooling for oppression: The lived experience of the returning RN student
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Rather, Marsha, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Nursing
Title:Clinical Assistant Professor
Registered Nurses represent one of the fastest growing cohorts in

baccalaureate schools of nursing. However, studies indicate that

many returning RNs (RRNs) are also displeased with baccalaureate

curricula, which are often perceived to be boring and repetitious

(Beeman, 1986; Hillsmith, 1978; MacLean, Knoll, and Kinney, 1985;

Murdock, 1986; Portnoy et al., 1980; Rendon, 1983; Smullen, 1983).

Studies have also documented a discrepancy between the way RRNs

view themselves and the way educators view them (Hillsmith, 1978;

Little and Brian, 1982; Presz, 1988; Smullen, 1983; Wilson and Levy,

1978). However, little research has been conducted from the RRNs'

perspective. Investigators have instead employed various

theoretical stances to study selected aspects of the return to

school situation, e.g., application of adult learning frameworks

(King, 1986, 1988; Presz, 1988), professional resocialization and

role theory (Baj, 1983; Gaines, 1987; Little and Brian, 1982),

stress and coping frameworks (Lee, 1987, 1988; McBride, 1985;

Vicino, 1987), and psychological constructs such as motivation

(Inman, 1982; Jackson, 1984; Murdock, 1986).



The purpose of this phenomenological study was to unveil common

meanings and shared practices embedded in the lived experience of

RNs returning to school in order to reveal new possibilities for

curriculum and instruction which would enhance their learning. RRN

volunteers from three baccalaureate nursing programs (N=15)

participated in extended, unstructured interviews. Participants

were asked to talk about whatever stood out in their mind about

being an RRN student. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed

verbatim and resulting texts were analyzed hermeneutically to

identify common meanings, relational themes across texts and,

finally, constitutive patterns expressing relationships among

themes. Heideggerian phenomenology was the philosophical

background for the analysis; secondary critical hermeneutical

analysis utilized feminist scholarship and critical social theory.



Hermeneutical analyses carried out in a seven-stage process (as

described in Diekelmann, Allen, and Tanner, 1989) by a team of

researchers revealed nine relational themes and one constitutive

pattern. Schooling For Oppression was a relational theme which

emerged from the data. This theme describes how the contested

ideology of professionalism within the issue of continued education

was used to prescribe the thoughts, values, and behavior of these

RRNs. Also described is the RRNs' strong resistance to the

rhetoric of professionalism, and to curricular and instructional

attempts to deskill them. Emancipatory teaching strategies are

explored.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSchooling for oppression: The lived experience of the returning RN studenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149530-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Schooling for oppression: The lived experience of the returning RN student</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rather, Marsha, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Registered Nurses represent one of the fastest growing cohorts in<br/><br/>baccalaureate schools of nursing. However, studies indicate that<br/><br/>many returning RNs (RRNs) are also displeased with baccalaureate<br/><br/>curricula, which are often perceived to be boring and repetitious<br/><br/>(Beeman, 1986; Hillsmith, 1978; MacLean, Knoll, and Kinney, 1985;<br/><br/>Murdock, 1986; Portnoy et al., 1980; Rendon, 1983; Smullen, 1983).<br/><br/>Studies have also documented a discrepancy between the way RRNs<br/><br/>view themselves and the way educators view them (Hillsmith, 1978;<br/><br/>Little and Brian, 1982; Presz, 1988; Smullen, 1983; Wilson and Levy,<br/><br/>1978). However, little research has been conducted from the RRNs'<br/><br/>perspective. Investigators have instead employed various<br/><br/>theoretical stances to study selected aspects of the return to<br/><br/>school situation, e.g., application of adult learning frameworks<br/><br/>(King, 1986, 1988; Presz, 1988), professional resocialization and<br/><br/>role theory (Baj, 1983; Gaines, 1987; Little and Brian, 1982),<br/><br/>stress and coping frameworks (Lee, 1987, 1988; McBride, 1985;<br/><br/>Vicino, 1987), and psychological constructs such as motivation<br/><br/>(Inman, 1982; Jackson, 1984; Murdock, 1986).<br/><br/><br/><br/>The purpose of this phenomenological study was to unveil common<br/><br/>meanings and shared practices embedded in the lived experience of<br/><br/>RNs returning to school in order to reveal new possibilities for<br/><br/>curriculum and instruction which would enhance their learning. RRN<br/><br/>volunteers from three baccalaureate nursing programs (N=15)<br/><br/>participated in extended, unstructured interviews. Participants<br/><br/>were asked to talk about whatever stood out in their mind about<br/><br/>being an RRN student. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed<br/><br/>verbatim and resulting texts were analyzed hermeneutically to<br/><br/>identify common meanings, relational themes across texts and,<br/><br/>finally, constitutive patterns expressing relationships among<br/><br/>themes. Heideggerian phenomenology was the philosophical<br/><br/>background for the analysis; secondary critical hermeneutical<br/><br/>analysis utilized feminist scholarship and critical social theory.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Hermeneutical analyses carried out in a seven-stage process (as<br/><br/>described in Diekelmann, Allen, and Tanner, 1989) by a team of<br/><br/>researchers revealed nine relational themes and one constitutive<br/><br/>pattern. Schooling For Oppression was a relational theme which<br/><br/>emerged from the data. This theme describes how the contested<br/><br/>ideology of professionalism within the issue of continued education<br/><br/>was used to prescribe the thoughts, values, and behavior of these<br/><br/>RRNs. Also described is the RRNs' strong resistance to the<br/><br/>rhetoric of professionalism, and to curricular and instructional<br/><br/>attempts to deskill them. Emancipatory teaching strategies are<br/><br/>explored.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:04:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:04:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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