Art instructors' level of awareness of hazardous art materials used in senior centers: A quantitative/qualitative study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149531
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Art instructors' level of awareness of hazardous art materials used in senior centers: A quantitative/qualitative study
Abstract:
Art instructors' level of awareness of hazardous art materials used in senior centers: A quantitative/qualitative study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Grabo, Theresa, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Binghamton University
Title:Associate Professor
Arts and crafts materials containing toxic chemicals have been

found to be hazardous to human health. Many of our aging

population participate in community art programs, and are

considered to be in a high risk category for developing health

problems from exposure to toxic chemicals. Using a survey

instrument this study examined Senior Centers in terms of the art

instructor's awareness of art materials found to be hazardous, how

art materials and facilities were used, and demographics of the

respondents.



The sample consisted of 50 art instructors in Senior Centers in

Eastern Pennsylvania. Additionally, six art instructors, three

working or volunteering in urban centers, and three in rural were

interviewed and their art classes observed using the survey tool as

a guide.



Awareness of hazardous art materials was determined by the art

instructors' responses to a awareness test on art hazards.

Respondents also identified what art materials were used in their

art rooms and how art materials and art facilities were used.



T-tests and Pearson (r) correlations were performed on the data.

Major findings include: 1) art education was positively correlated

with awareness of art hazards (p=.01) while financial compensation,

teaching or work experience had no significant effect, 2) art

education had a significant effect on the use of storage (p=.01),

but no effect on the remaining safety variables, financial

compensation had no effect on awareness of safety factors, 3)

instructors with prior work experience took more precautions in the

use of storage (p=.04), housekeeping (p=.0005), personal protection

(p=.005), and ventilation (p=.03), fire safety and personal hygiene

showed no relationship, 4) teaching experience was positively

correlated with personal protection (p=.02), but there was no

significant difference with the remaining variables, 5) art hazards

awareness was positively correlated with use of storage (p=.001),

housekeeping (p=.02), personal hygiene (p=.03), and personal

protection (p=.03), no significant relationships were found with

fire safety or ventilation. This study has implications for

nursing on a interdisciplinary level: 1) public health education

regarding the health hazards associated with toxic arts and crafts

materials, 2) client education fostering the safe use of art media,

and health promotion and prevention throughout the life span, 3)

client advocacy with respect to the right to know, and promoting

competence for self-care, 4) nursing education concerning high risk

groups, and 5) nursing practice in terms of protecting and

promoting health through social and environmental change.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleArt instructors' level of awareness of hazardous art materials used in senior centers: A quantitative/qualitative studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149531-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Art instructors' level of awareness of hazardous art materials used in senior centers: A quantitative/qualitative study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Grabo, Theresa, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Binghamton University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tgrabo@binghamton.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Arts and crafts materials containing toxic chemicals have been<br/><br/>found to be hazardous to human health. Many of our aging<br/><br/>population participate in community art programs, and are<br/><br/>considered to be in a high risk category for developing health<br/><br/>problems from exposure to toxic chemicals. Using a survey<br/><br/>instrument this study examined Senior Centers in terms of the art<br/><br/>instructor's awareness of art materials found to be hazardous, how<br/><br/>art materials and facilities were used, and demographics of the<br/><br/>respondents.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The sample consisted of 50 art instructors in Senior Centers in<br/><br/>Eastern Pennsylvania. Additionally, six art instructors, three<br/><br/>working or volunteering in urban centers, and three in rural were<br/><br/>interviewed and their art classes observed using the survey tool as<br/><br/>a guide.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Awareness of hazardous art materials was determined by the art<br/><br/>instructors' responses to a awareness test on art hazards.<br/><br/>Respondents also identified what art materials were used in their<br/><br/>art rooms and how art materials and art facilities were used.<br/><br/><br/><br/>T-tests and Pearson (r) correlations were performed on the data.<br/><br/>Major findings include: 1) art education was positively correlated<br/><br/>with awareness of art hazards (p=.01) while financial compensation,<br/><br/>teaching or work experience had no significant effect, 2) art<br/><br/>education had a significant effect on the use of storage (p=.01),<br/><br/>but no effect on the remaining safety variables, financial<br/><br/>compensation had no effect on awareness of safety factors, 3)<br/><br/>instructors with prior work experience took more precautions in the<br/><br/>use of storage (p=.04), housekeeping (p=.0005), personal protection<br/><br/>(p=.005), and ventilation (p=.03), fire safety and personal hygiene<br/><br/>showed no relationship, 4) teaching experience was positively<br/><br/>correlated with personal protection (p=.02), but there was no<br/><br/>significant difference with the remaining variables, 5) art hazards<br/><br/>awareness was positively correlated with use of storage (p=.001),<br/><br/>housekeeping (p=.02), personal hygiene (p=.03), and personal<br/><br/>protection (p=.03), no significant relationships were found with<br/><br/>fire safety or ventilation. This study has implications for<br/><br/>nursing on a interdisciplinary level: 1) public health education<br/><br/>regarding the health hazards associated with toxic arts and crafts<br/><br/>materials, 2) client education fostering the safe use of art media,<br/><br/>and health promotion and prevention throughout the life span, 3)<br/><br/>client advocacy with respect to the right to know, and promoting<br/><br/>competence for self-care, 4) nursing education concerning high risk<br/><br/>groups, and 5) nursing practice in terms of protecting and<br/><br/>promoting health through social and environmental change.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:04:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:04:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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