A philosophical analysis of being there and caring, with application of The Theoretical Model of Professional Nurse Caring in rural nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149533
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A philosophical analysis of being there and caring, with application of The Theoretical Model of Professional Nurse Caring in rural nursing
Abstract:
A philosophical analysis of being there and caring, with application of The Theoretical Model of Professional Nurse Caring in rural nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Hernandez, Carol, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Vermont College of Norwich University
Title:Assistant Professor
This descriptive study used a phenomenologic design to investigate

the meaning of being there as a lived experience in the

professional caring practice of 30 nurses. Using concepts from

Heidegger (1962) and Kierkegaard (1954), the research question

asked: What is the meaning of the lived experience of being there

for client-families in the caring practice of professional nurses?

Subjects came from a purposive sample of 35 nurses with at least

baccalaureate degree from Northern New England who stated that they

had experience of giving caring within the Theoretical Model of

Professional Nurse Caring (Hernandez, 1987, 1989, 1991) framework,

and who were willing to discuss their perceptions and use of being

there in their caring. Thirty nurses were interviewed using the

open-ended question: Tell me what the nursing presence, or being

there, means to you in your client-family caring. Explain as fully

as possible. Cue questions were asked to clarify or extend

exploration as fully as possible. Data were audio-recorded,

researcher-transcribed, and treated confidentially. Data analysis

was conducted using the Colaizzi (1978) method. Validity and

reliability were sought using Goodwin and Goodwin's (1984)

criteria. Five themes of being there emerged from the data,

yielding an exhaustive description of being there as an expression

of professional caring in nursing. This description provided for

the development of the fundamental structure of being there in

professional caring, which was found to require that the nurse

provide an holistic presence for the client-family. In choosing to

be present for the client-family, it was found that participant

feelings of aloneness were both transformed and diminished, and

that the nurse was simultaneously present for the self. The key to

this transformation was discovered to be the nurse's feeling of

technical competence and professional confidence in nursing

practice. In addition, findings suggested that the nurse's choice

to be present for the client-family may be important in validating

one's own humanity (Levinias, 1989). Because being there for

client-families was found to be integral to the Theoretical Model's

notion of Professional Nurse Caring, findings support the need for

staffing patterns that allow time for new practitioner achievement

of technical competence, as well as time for experienced nurses to

develop meaningful nursing presence with client-families. The

finding that being there is essential to giving and receiving

professional caring in nursing has implications for education,

practice, administration, and research. Findings suggest that

being there in nursing may be essential to caring's therapeutic

practice, and add validity to the Theoretical Model of Professional

Nurse Caring (Hernandez, 1987, 1989, 1991).



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA philosophical analysis of being there and caring, with application of The Theoretical Model of Professional Nurse Caring in rural nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149533-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A philosophical analysis of being there and caring, with application of The Theoretical Model of Professional Nurse Caring in rural nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hernandez, Carol, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Vermont College of Norwich University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This descriptive study used a phenomenologic design to investigate<br/><br/>the meaning of being there as a lived experience in the<br/><br/>professional caring practice of 30 nurses. Using concepts from<br/><br/>Heidegger (1962) and Kierkegaard (1954), the research question<br/><br/>asked: What is the meaning of the lived experience of being there<br/><br/>for client-families in the caring practice of professional nurses?<br/><br/>Subjects came from a purposive sample of 35 nurses with at least<br/><br/>baccalaureate degree from Northern New England who stated that they<br/><br/>had experience of giving caring within the Theoretical Model of<br/><br/>Professional Nurse Caring (Hernandez, 1987, 1989, 1991) framework,<br/><br/>and who were willing to discuss their perceptions and use of being<br/><br/>there in their caring. Thirty nurses were interviewed using the<br/><br/>open-ended question: Tell me what the nursing presence, or being<br/><br/>there, means to you in your client-family caring. Explain as fully<br/><br/>as possible. Cue questions were asked to clarify or extend<br/><br/>exploration as fully as possible. Data were audio-recorded,<br/><br/>researcher-transcribed, and treated confidentially. Data analysis<br/><br/>was conducted using the Colaizzi (1978) method. Validity and<br/><br/>reliability were sought using Goodwin and Goodwin's (1984)<br/><br/>criteria. Five themes of being there emerged from the data,<br/><br/>yielding an exhaustive description of being there as an expression<br/><br/>of professional caring in nursing. This description provided for<br/><br/>the development of the fundamental structure of being there in<br/><br/>professional caring, which was found to require that the nurse<br/><br/>provide an holistic presence for the client-family. In choosing to<br/><br/>be present for the client-family, it was found that participant<br/><br/>feelings of aloneness were both transformed and diminished, and<br/><br/>that the nurse was simultaneously present for the self. The key to<br/><br/>this transformation was discovered to be the nurse's feeling of<br/><br/>technical competence and professional confidence in nursing<br/><br/>practice. In addition, findings suggested that the nurse's choice<br/><br/>to be present for the client-family may be important in validating<br/><br/>one's own humanity (Levinias, 1989). Because being there for<br/><br/>client-families was found to be integral to the Theoretical Model's<br/><br/>notion of Professional Nurse Caring, findings support the need for<br/><br/>staffing patterns that allow time for new practitioner achievement<br/><br/>of technical competence, as well as time for experienced nurses to<br/><br/>develop meaningful nursing presence with client-families. The<br/><br/>finding that being there is essential to giving and receiving<br/><br/>professional caring in nursing has implications for education,<br/><br/>practice, administration, and research. Findings suggest that<br/><br/>being there in nursing may be essential to caring's therapeutic<br/><br/>practice, and add validity to the Theoretical Model of Professional<br/><br/>Nurse Caring (Hernandez, 1987, 1989, 1991).<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:04:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:04:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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