Comparison of learning outcomes between graduate students in telecourses and those in traditional classrooms

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149534
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of learning outcomes between graduate students in telecourses and those in traditional classrooms
Abstract:
Comparison of learning outcomes between graduate students in telecourses and those in traditional classrooms
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Keck, Juanita, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
It has been predicted that by 1990, there would be a shortage of

344,000 nurses with masters degrees (Harrington, 1988). A major

factor limiting the education of master-prepared nurses is access

to graduate education. A potential solution is to provide

educational opportunities by distance learning through courses

taught by live television. The expectation that distance learning

is as effective as learning in a traditional classroom setting is

based on the Cartesian theory of knowledge. The theory proposes

that students learn on their own regardless of the setting. They

need a source of the information to be learned and a means of

communicating that information. Today's technology allows for

these needs to be met by either traditional or TV settings

(Bruffee, 1982; Purdy, 1986). A number of articles have been

published reporting successful course delivery by TV.

Unfortunately, few of these were based on objective data. Only two

data-based studies have been reported which investigated learning

outcomes of graduate students engaged in distance learning. Barron

(1987) studied librarians and Wergin (1986) studied mechanical

engineers. In both cases, there were minimal differences in

objective tests of learning between students in traditional classes

and those in telecourses. A large university in the Midwest has

instituted a distance learning program for graduate students

pursuing a masters degree in nursing. The purpose of this study

was to investigate differences in learning outcomes between

graduate students who took a nursing-based measurement course

(Measurement and Data Analysis) by television and those who took

the course in a traditional setting. The sample consisted of 133

graduate students taking the course in traditional classrooms and

159 students in TV settings. Data from 15 classes, 8 traditional

and 7 TV, over a period of 5 years were included. The two groups

were similar in age and nursing experience. The same instructor

taught all 15 classes and lecture content and course requirements

did not differ between the two groups. The TV classes were

televised live with talk-back capability for all students. Five

indices of learning outcomes were assessed; percent correct of each

of 4 exams and final course grade. No significant differences were

found for course grade and exams three and four. Although

significant differences were found for total percent correct and

exams one and two (exam one results--mean traditional = 89.97, mean

telecourse = 87.4, t=-2.83 p=.005; exam two results--mean

tradition = 84.6, mean telecourse = 81.2, t=-3.38, p=.001), the

magnitude of the differences is relatively small (2.2 to 3.4

percentage points). Point Biserial analysis demonstrated that no

more than three percent of variance in learning outcome was

accounted for by classroom setting. Results suggest that the

setting had a negligible effect on learning outcomes. Study

results support that graduate students engaged in distance learning

by television are able to learn as well as students in traditional

classrooms.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of learning outcomes between graduate students in telecourses and those in traditional classroomsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149534-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of learning outcomes between graduate students in telecourses and those in traditional classrooms</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keck, Juanita, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">It has been predicted that by 1990, there would be a shortage of<br/><br/>344,000 nurses with masters degrees (Harrington, 1988). A major<br/><br/>factor limiting the education of master-prepared nurses is access<br/><br/>to graduate education. A potential solution is to provide<br/><br/>educational opportunities by distance learning through courses<br/><br/>taught by live television. The expectation that distance learning<br/><br/>is as effective as learning in a traditional classroom setting is<br/><br/>based on the Cartesian theory of knowledge. The theory proposes<br/><br/>that students learn on their own regardless of the setting. They<br/><br/>need a source of the information to be learned and a means of<br/><br/>communicating that information. Today's technology allows for<br/><br/>these needs to be met by either traditional or TV settings<br/><br/>(Bruffee, 1982; Purdy, 1986). A number of articles have been<br/><br/>published reporting successful course delivery by TV.<br/><br/>Unfortunately, few of these were based on objective data. Only two<br/><br/>data-based studies have been reported which investigated learning<br/><br/>outcomes of graduate students engaged in distance learning. Barron<br/><br/>(1987) studied librarians and Wergin (1986) studied mechanical<br/><br/>engineers. In both cases, there were minimal differences in<br/><br/>objective tests of learning between students in traditional classes<br/><br/>and those in telecourses. A large university in the Midwest has<br/><br/>instituted a distance learning program for graduate students<br/><br/>pursuing a masters degree in nursing. The purpose of this study<br/><br/>was to investigate differences in learning outcomes between<br/><br/>graduate students who took a nursing-based measurement course<br/><br/>(Measurement and Data Analysis) by television and those who took<br/><br/>the course in a traditional setting. The sample consisted of 133<br/><br/>graduate students taking the course in traditional classrooms and<br/><br/>159 students in TV settings. Data from 15 classes, 8 traditional<br/><br/>and 7 TV, over a period of 5 years were included. The two groups<br/><br/>were similar in age and nursing experience. The same instructor<br/><br/>taught all 15 classes and lecture content and course requirements<br/><br/>did not differ between the two groups. The TV classes were<br/><br/>televised live with talk-back capability for all students. Five<br/><br/>indices of learning outcomes were assessed; percent correct of each<br/><br/>of 4 exams and final course grade. No significant differences were<br/><br/>found for course grade and exams three and four. Although<br/><br/>significant differences were found for total percent correct and<br/><br/>exams one and two (exam one results--mean traditional = 89.97, mean<br/><br/>telecourse = 87.4, t=-2.83 p=.005; exam two results--mean<br/><br/>tradition = 84.6, mean telecourse = 81.2, t=-3.38, p=.001), the<br/><br/>magnitude of the differences is relatively small (2.2 to 3.4<br/><br/>percentage points). Point Biserial analysis demonstrated that no<br/><br/>more than three percent of variance in learning outcome was<br/><br/>accounted for by classroom setting. Results suggest that the<br/><br/>setting had a negligible effect on learning outcomes. Study<br/><br/>results support that graduate students engaged in distance learning<br/><br/>by television are able to learn as well as students in traditional<br/><br/>classrooms.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:04:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:04:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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