The healing process of adult incest survivors: Constructing a personal residence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149536
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The healing process of adult incest survivors: Constructing a personal residence
Abstract:
The healing process of adult incest survivors: Constructing a personal residence
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Draucker, Claire, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Professor
Problem: In order to provide therapeutic services for adult

survivors of incest who seek treatment, nurses must have an

appreciation for the psychological processes that facilitate the

survivors' healing from the trauma of childhood sexual abuse.

The purpose of this study was to generate a theoretical framework

of the healing process of adult survivors of incest based on the

perceptions of survivors who have experienced some degree of

healing.



Background: Much of the adult incest survivor literature has been

focused on three areas of inquiry: the prevalence of childhood

sexual abuse in the general population (Finkelhor, 1979; Russell,

1983) and in certain clinical populations (Benward and

Densen-Gerber, 1975; Carmen, Reiker, and Mills, 1984; James and

Meyerding, 1977), the long-term effects of sexual abuse (Herman,

Russell, and Trocki, 1986; Meiselman, 1978), and the relationship

between characteristics of the abuse experience and long-term

effects (Finkelhor, 1970; Herman et al., 1986). There has been

little research, however, aimed at understanding of the processes

that lead to healing.



Methods: This project is a qualitative study in which grounded

theory (Glaser and Strauss, 1967) methods were used. Grounded

theory is an inductive method used to generate a theoretical

framework based on concepts which emerge from the data. In this

study, the data consisted of descriptions of life experiences by

those survivors who have experienced healing from the trauma of

childhood sexual abuse. From these descriptions, a theoretical

framework of healing was generated.



The sample consisted of 11 adult women incest survivors who

considered themselves to have experienced some healing.

Participants were recruited with the help of area professionals

who specialized in women's issues or victimization issues. The

investigator also directly contacted individuals who had

identified themselves as incest survivors and who had shared, in

some public context (e.g., media, educational setting,

conference), their own healing experience. Formal, unstructured

interviews lasting 1 to 2 hours were conducted.



Data Analysis: The data were analyzed with techniques from

grounded theory methodology including substantive coding,

theoretical coding, memoing, and diagramming. A conceptual

framework based on a core variable was identified (Corbin,

1986; Glaser, 1978; Glaser and Strauss, 1967).



Results: The participants of this study each described healing

experiences that were unique and varied. All the women, however,

described a process that was lengthy, difficult, and often

acutely painful, active, and rewarding. The participants

described not only dealing with cognitions, feelings, and

perceptions, but rather described designing and building a new

social and personal world for themselves. Therefore, the

metaphor of constructing a new residence is used to reflect the

process as it was explained by the survivors and serves as the

core variable of the conceptual framework. The conceptual

framework is based on several main processes which comprise the

healing process described by the participants. These processes

include deciding to build a new place for oneself in the world,

constructing a new relationship with the self to provide

nurturing and security, regulating one's relationships with

others, and influencing the community in a meaningful way.



rsing Press, 550 W.

North St. Indianapolis, IN 46202
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe healing process of adult incest survivors: Constructing a personal residenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149536-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The healing process of adult incest survivors: Constructing a personal residence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Draucker, Claire, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cdraucke@kent.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: In order to provide therapeutic services for adult<br/><br/>survivors of incest who seek treatment, nurses must have an<br/><br/>appreciation for the psychological processes that facilitate the<br/><br/>survivors' healing from the trauma of childhood sexual abuse.<br/><br/>The purpose of this study was to generate a theoretical framework<br/><br/>of the healing process of adult survivors of incest based on the<br/><br/>perceptions of survivors who have experienced some degree of<br/><br/>healing.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Background: Much of the adult incest survivor literature has been<br/><br/>focused on three areas of inquiry: the prevalence of childhood<br/><br/>sexual abuse in the general population (Finkelhor, 1979; Russell,<br/><br/>1983) and in certain clinical populations (Benward and<br/><br/>Densen-Gerber, 1975; Carmen, Reiker, and Mills, 1984; James and<br/><br/>Meyerding, 1977), the long-term effects of sexual abuse (Herman,<br/><br/>Russell, and Trocki, 1986; Meiselman, 1978), and the relationship<br/><br/>between characteristics of the abuse experience and long-term<br/><br/>effects (Finkelhor, 1970; Herman et al., 1986). There has been<br/><br/>little research, however, aimed at understanding of the processes<br/><br/>that lead to healing.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Methods: This project is a qualitative study in which grounded<br/><br/>theory (Glaser and Strauss, 1967) methods were used. Grounded<br/><br/>theory is an inductive method used to generate a theoretical<br/><br/>framework based on concepts which emerge from the data. In this<br/><br/>study, the data consisted of descriptions of life experiences by<br/><br/>those survivors who have experienced healing from the trauma of<br/><br/>childhood sexual abuse. From these descriptions, a theoretical<br/><br/>framework of healing was generated.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The sample consisted of 11 adult women incest survivors who<br/><br/>considered themselves to have experienced some healing.<br/><br/>Participants were recruited with the help of area professionals<br/><br/>who specialized in women's issues or victimization issues. The<br/><br/>investigator also directly contacted individuals who had<br/><br/>identified themselves as incest survivors and who had shared, in<br/><br/>some public context (e.g., media, educational setting,<br/><br/>conference), their own healing experience. Formal, unstructured<br/><br/>interviews lasting 1 to 2 hours were conducted.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Data Analysis: The data were analyzed with techniques from<br/><br/>grounded theory methodology including substantive coding,<br/><br/>theoretical coding, memoing, and diagramming. A conceptual<br/><br/>framework based on a core variable was identified (Corbin,<br/><br/>1986; Glaser, 1978; Glaser and Strauss, 1967).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Results: The participants of this study each described healing<br/><br/>experiences that were unique and varied. All the women, however,<br/><br/>described a process that was lengthy, difficult, and often<br/><br/>acutely painful, active, and rewarding. The participants<br/><br/>described not only dealing with cognitions, feelings, and<br/><br/>perceptions, but rather described designing and building a new<br/><br/>social and personal world for themselves. Therefore, the<br/><br/>metaphor of constructing a new residence is used to reflect the<br/><br/>process as it was explained by the survivors and serves as the<br/><br/>core variable of the conceptual framework. The conceptual<br/><br/>framework is based on several main processes which comprise the<br/><br/>healing process described by the participants. These processes<br/><br/>include deciding to build a new place for oneself in the world,<br/><br/>constructing a new relationship with the self to provide<br/><br/>nurturing and security, regulating one's relationships with<br/><br/>others, and influencing the community in a meaningful way.<br/><br/><br/><br/>rsing Press, 550 W.<br/><br/>North St. Indianapolis, IN 46202</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:04:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:04:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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