Blending Critical Care Nursing and Community-Based Nursing: Preparing BSN Students for Practice in the New Millennium

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149539
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Blending Critical Care Nursing and Community-Based Nursing: Preparing BSN Students for Practice in the New Millennium
Abstract:
Blending Critical Care Nursing and Community-Based Nursing: Preparing BSN Students for Practice in the New Millennium
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Bucher, Linda, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Delaware
Title:Assistant Professor
Background/Problem: The dramatic shifts from inpatient to outpatient care in the 1980s and the restructuring of health systems in the 1990s have resulted in a surge of home health nursing services. Further, the acuity of patients discharged from acute care settings is higher than ever before. Shorter hospital stays and high-tech home care have become standard as nursing enters the new millennium. Portable, safe and life-sustaining equipment (ex. ventilators) and treatments (ex. home phototherapy) are easily and cost effectively delivered in the home. Yet, home care agencies are currently facing a severe shortage of qualified nurses. Solution: The development of nursing curricula that prepared students to provide community-based critical care nursing (CBCCN) at the entry level. Implementation: In the fall of 2000, a regional survey of home care agencies was conducted to identify the essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed by new graduate RNs to practice CBCCN. Using the survey results and recommendations from the collaborating home care agencies, the faculty developed and implemented an elective senior level, precepted clinical course (168 hrs.) and an elective senior-level theory course (56 hours) on CBCCN. Clinical experiences and classroom content focused on the care of critically ill and/or technology dependent patients across the lifespan, their families, and the communities in which they lived. A one-day Preceptor Development Workshop was held for agency nurses before the start of the course. Students worked intensely with nurse preceptors in adult and pediatric home care agencies. Outcomes: Evaluation data from students, preceptors, faculty, the collaborating agencies, patients/families, and employers will be presented. The variables examined included satisfaction levels, knowledge and skill acquisition, and employment patterns.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBlending Critical Care Nursing and Community-Based Nursing: Preparing BSN Students for Practice in the New Millenniumen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149539-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Blending Critical Care Nursing and Community-Based Nursing: Preparing BSN Students for Practice in the New Millennium</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bucher, Linda, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Delaware</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lbucher@udel.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background/Problem: The dramatic shifts from inpatient to outpatient care in the 1980s and the restructuring of health systems in the 1990s have resulted in a surge of home health nursing services. Further, the acuity of patients discharged from acute care settings is higher than ever before. Shorter hospital stays and high-tech home care have become standard as nursing enters the new millennium. Portable, safe and life-sustaining equipment (ex. ventilators) and treatments (ex. home phototherapy) are easily and cost effectively delivered in the home. Yet, home care agencies are currently facing a severe shortage of qualified nurses. Solution: The development of nursing curricula that prepared students to provide community-based critical care nursing (CBCCN) at the entry level. Implementation: In the fall of 2000, a regional survey of home care agencies was conducted to identify the essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed by new graduate RNs to practice CBCCN. Using the survey results and recommendations from the collaborating home care agencies, the faculty developed and implemented an elective senior level, precepted clinical course (168 hrs.) and an elective senior-level theory course (56 hours) on CBCCN. Clinical experiences and classroom content focused on the care of critically ill and/or technology dependent patients across the lifespan, their families, and the communities in which they lived. A one-day Preceptor Development Workshop was held for agency nurses before the start of the course. Students worked intensely with nurse preceptors in adult and pediatric home care agencies. Outcomes: Evaluation data from students, preceptors, faculty, the collaborating agencies, patients/families, and employers will be presented. The variables examined included satisfaction levels, knowledge and skill acquisition, and employment patterns.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:04:26Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:04:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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