2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149545
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Smoking cessation intervention in pregnancy
Abstract:
Smoking cessation intervention in pregnancy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Albrecht, Susan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh
Title:Assistant Professor
In order for the Surgeon General's Year 2000 objective for

achieving a reduction in smoking prevalence among pregnant women to

be met, interventions encouraging smoking cessation must be

initiated and evaluated. Of the 31 percent of pregnant women who

smoke at the onset of their pregnancy (USDHHS 1989), 65 percent to

85 percent of these women continue to smoke during their

pregnancy (Gritz and Berman 1989). (Cigarette smoke contains more

than 1,000 known chemical compounds. Two components of smoke,

nicotine and carbon monoxide, have been implicated as causing the

majority of the adverse effects smoking has on pregnancy and the

developing fetus (Gordon, 1985).



The purpose of this pilot study is to investigate the use of three

different anti-smoking interventions during pregnancy. The

specific aims of this applied health-promotion oriented research

are to: (1) scientifically evaluate the feasibility of three

different approaches to smoking cessation among pregnant women; (2)

to evaluate acceptability of procedures to pregnant women; and (3)

use the results of this study to seek additional external funding.



An experimental, three group research design was used to collect

the data. Pregnant smoking women were recruited from eight private

obstetrical practices in the Pittsburgh area. The sampling

procedure was a non-probability approach using random assignment to

one of three intervention groups. Group 1 used the 21 Day Stop

Smoking Program by the American Lung Association (1979); Group 2

used the Freedom from Smoking for You and Your Baby Program

(American Lung Association, 1986); and Group 3 a nursing based

Education/Support Program. The total number of this pilot study is

30; 10 in each group. Subjects were pretested using the

Preintervention Data Questionnaire and baseline carbon monoxide

level. After completion of treatment, the subjects were posttested

using a Post-Intervention Questionnaire.



Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the sample's

demographic characteristics. Non-parametric statistics (Kruskel-

Wallis One Way Analysis of Variance by ranks) were used to test for

significant differences between groups. All hypotheses were tested

at the .05 alpha level. The research served as a pilot study to

determine the feasibility of subject recruitment, evaluate

attendance at support group meetings, and provide information

regarding data assessment instruments. There was no significant

difference between the three intervention groups with regard to an

effective smoking cessation intervention.



The study has general significance in the health promotion of both

the mother and the fetus. This research was significant in other

ways; first, it provided new and specific knowledge about three

treatment interventions designed to alleviate smoking behavior in

pregnant women. While all three of these strategies may be

relatively effective, they differ markedly in cost. Second, the

research aids in the development of research-based on clinically

useful scientific applications for promotion and maintenance of

maternal-child health by nurse clinicians.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSmoking cessation intervention in pregnancyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149545-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Smoking cessation intervention in pregnancy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Albrecht, Susan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">saa01+@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In order for the Surgeon General's Year 2000 objective for<br/><br/>achieving a reduction in smoking prevalence among pregnant women to<br/><br/>be met, interventions encouraging smoking cessation must be<br/><br/>initiated and evaluated. Of the 31 percent of pregnant women who<br/><br/>smoke at the onset of their pregnancy (USDHHS 1989), 65 percent to<br/><br/>85 percent of these women continue to smoke during their<br/><br/>pregnancy (Gritz and Berman 1989). (Cigarette smoke contains more<br/><br/>than 1,000 known chemical compounds. Two components of smoke,<br/><br/>nicotine and carbon monoxide, have been implicated as causing the<br/><br/>majority of the adverse effects smoking has on pregnancy and the<br/><br/>developing fetus (Gordon, 1985).<br/><br/><br/><br/>The purpose of this pilot study is to investigate the use of three<br/><br/>different anti-smoking interventions during pregnancy. The<br/><br/>specific aims of this applied health-promotion oriented research<br/><br/>are to: (1) scientifically evaluate the feasibility of three<br/><br/>different approaches to smoking cessation among pregnant women; (2)<br/><br/>to evaluate acceptability of procedures to pregnant women; and (3)<br/><br/>use the results of this study to seek additional external funding.<br/><br/><br/><br/>An experimental, three group research design was used to collect<br/><br/>the data. Pregnant smoking women were recruited from eight private<br/><br/>obstetrical practices in the Pittsburgh area. The sampling<br/><br/>procedure was a non-probability approach using random assignment to<br/><br/>one of three intervention groups. Group 1 used the 21 Day Stop<br/><br/>Smoking Program by the American Lung Association (1979); Group 2<br/><br/>used the Freedom from Smoking for You and Your Baby Program<br/><br/>(American Lung Association, 1986); and Group 3 a nursing based<br/><br/>Education/Support Program. The total number of this pilot study is<br/><br/>30; 10 in each group. Subjects were pretested using the<br/><br/>Preintervention Data Questionnaire and baseline carbon monoxide<br/><br/>level. After completion of treatment, the subjects were posttested<br/><br/>using a Post-Intervention Questionnaire.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the sample's<br/><br/>demographic characteristics. Non-parametric statistics (Kruskel-<br/><br/>Wallis One Way Analysis of Variance by ranks) were used to test for<br/><br/>significant differences between groups. All hypotheses were tested<br/><br/>at the .05 alpha level. The research served as a pilot study to<br/><br/>determine the feasibility of subject recruitment, evaluate<br/><br/>attendance at support group meetings, and provide information<br/><br/>regarding data assessment instruments. There was no significant<br/><br/>difference between the three intervention groups with regard to an<br/><br/>effective smoking cessation intervention.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The study has general significance in the health promotion of both<br/><br/>the mother and the fetus. This research was significant in other<br/><br/>ways; first, it provided new and specific knowledge about three<br/><br/>treatment interventions designed to alleviate smoking behavior in<br/><br/>pregnant women. While all three of these strategies may be<br/><br/>relatively effective, they differ markedly in cost. Second, the<br/><br/>research aids in the development of research-based on clinically<br/><br/>useful scientific applications for promotion and maintenance of<br/><br/>maternal-child health by nurse clinicians.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:04:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:04:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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