2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149546
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Socialization of new graduate nurses in critical care (DISS)
Abstract:
Socialization of new graduate nurses in critical care (DISS)
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Boyle, Diane, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:School of Nursing
Medical College of Georgia
Title:Assistant Professor
Not since Kramer's (1968, 1969, 1974), Feldman's (1976), and

Brief et al.'s (1979) studies has a theoretical model of

socialization been applied to nurses. Therefore, the study

purpose was to examine a modification of Feldman's 3-stage

(anticipatory socialization, accommodation, and role management)

socialization theory with new graduate nurses (NGs) in critical

care. The accommodation stage process in which new nurses see

what the organization is really like and attempt to become

members was the focus.



Research questions were: (1) What changes in accommodation stage

variables of role conception (professional boundaries, authority,

and direct patient services), commitment, self-confidence, and

state-anxiety occur in NGs over the first 6 months of employment?

(2) What differences exist between NGs at initial employment and

experienced registered nurses employed in critical care longer

than 6 months (ENs) on accommodation stage variables? (3) What

differences exist between NGs at 6 months of employment and ENs

on accommodation stage variables and on role management stage

variables of mutual influence, resolution of outside life

conflicts, and resolution of conflicting demands at work?



For NGs (n=50), data were collected by questionnaire at 1-2

weeks, 3 months, and 6 months of employment; for ENs (n=89) data

were collected only once. Reliabilities >.60 were established

for all instruments.



Using repeated measures MANOVA, NGs showed significant overall

changes in accommodation variables over the initial 6 months of

employment (F=2.87, P=.0l5). Univariate follow-up tests showed

a significant linear decrease in professional boundaries; a

significant quadratic change in direct patient services -- an

increase from initial employment to 3 months, then a decrease

from 3 months to 6 months; and a significant linear decrease in

commitment. At initial employment, NGs scored significantly

different overall on accommodation variables from ENs as

indicated by MANOVA (F=7.33, P=.000).



Univariate followup tests showed that NGs scored significantly

higher than ENs on professional boundaries, authority, and

commitment; but scored significantly lower on self-confidence.

There was an overall significant MANOVA on socialization

variables between NGs at 6 months and ENs (F=1.89, P=.032).

However, univariate followup tests showed significant differences

only on self-confidence and the role management variable of

mutual influence.



For new graduate nurses changes in accommodation variable scores

over 6 months were toward the mean of the experienced nurses,

which supports the role theory principle that changes in scores

of new employees will occur in the direction of peer group

scores. At 6 months differences existed only on self-confidence

and mutual influence; these 2 variables may differentiate

accommodation from role management.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocialization of new graduate nurses in critical care (DISS)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149546-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Socialization of new graduate nurses in critical care (DISS)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Boyle, Diane, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing<br/>Medical College of Georgia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Not since Kramer's (1968, 1969, 1974), Feldman's (1976), and<br/><br/>Brief et al.'s (1979) studies has a theoretical model of<br/><br/>socialization been applied to nurses. Therefore, the study<br/><br/>purpose was to examine a modification of Feldman's 3-stage<br/><br/>(anticipatory socialization, accommodation, and role management)<br/><br/>socialization theory with new graduate nurses (NGs) in critical<br/><br/>care. The accommodation stage process in which new nurses see<br/><br/>what the organization is really like and attempt to become<br/><br/>members was the focus.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Research questions were: (1) What changes in accommodation stage<br/><br/>variables of role conception (professional boundaries, authority,<br/><br/>and direct patient services), commitment, self-confidence, and<br/><br/>state-anxiety occur in NGs over the first 6 months of employment?<br/><br/>(2) What differences exist between NGs at initial employment and<br/><br/>experienced registered nurses employed in critical care longer<br/><br/>than 6 months (ENs) on accommodation stage variables? (3) What<br/><br/>differences exist between NGs at 6 months of employment and ENs<br/><br/>on accommodation stage variables and on role management stage<br/><br/>variables of mutual influence, resolution of outside life<br/><br/>conflicts, and resolution of conflicting demands at work?<br/><br/><br/><br/>For NGs (n=50), data were collected by questionnaire at 1-2<br/><br/>weeks, 3 months, and 6 months of employment; for ENs (n=89) data<br/><br/>were collected only once. Reliabilities &gt;.60 were established<br/><br/>for all instruments.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Using repeated measures MANOVA, NGs showed significant overall<br/><br/>changes in accommodation variables over the initial 6 months of<br/><br/>employment (F=2.87, P=.0l5). Univariate follow-up tests showed<br/><br/>a significant linear decrease in professional boundaries; a<br/><br/>significant quadratic change in direct patient services -- an<br/><br/>increase from initial employment to 3 months, then a decrease<br/><br/>from 3 months to 6 months; and a significant linear decrease in<br/><br/>commitment. At initial employment, NGs scored significantly<br/><br/>different overall on accommodation variables from ENs as<br/><br/>indicated by MANOVA (F=7.33, P=.000).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Univariate followup tests showed that NGs scored significantly<br/><br/>higher than ENs on professional boundaries, authority, and<br/><br/>commitment; but scored significantly lower on self-confidence.<br/><br/>There was an overall significant MANOVA on socialization<br/><br/>variables between NGs at 6 months and ENs (F=1.89, P=.032).<br/><br/>However, univariate followup tests showed significant differences<br/><br/>only on self-confidence and the role management variable of<br/><br/>mutual influence.<br/><br/><br/><br/>For new graduate nurses changes in accommodation variable scores<br/><br/>over 6 months were toward the mean of the experienced nurses,<br/><br/>which supports the role theory principle that changes in scores<br/><br/>of new employees will occur in the direction of peer group<br/><br/>scores. At 6 months differences existed only on self-confidence<br/><br/>and mutual influence; these 2 variables may differentiate<br/><br/>accommodation from role management.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:04:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:04:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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