Parenting stress: Homeless and nonhomeless families with preschoolers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149547
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parenting stress: Homeless and nonhomeless families with preschoolers
Abstract:
Parenting stress: Homeless and nonhomeless families with preschoolers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Brendel, Jacquelyn, MS/MSc
Title:ARNP
The parenting stress perceptions of homeless and nonhomeless

parents with preschool age children have important implications on

the parent-child relationship. This relationship is examined from

within a family systems and developmental theoretical framework.

Parenting stress perceptions are defined by Abidin (1983) and

operationalized by the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) (Abidin, 1983).

The PSI is a 120 item self-report questionnaire which consists of

a total parenting stress index score, parent domain score, child

domain score, total life stress score. Subscale scores delineate

specific variables within each domain. This study utilized the PSI

to investigate whether there were statistically significant

differences between homeless and nonhomeless parents' perceptions

of parenting stress.



As ex post facto design was utilized to collect questionnaire data

from homeless parents with preschoolers residing in a homeless

family shelter and from nonhomeless parents with preschoolers

enrolled in an educational child care center. Descriptive

statistics were utilized to examine demographic data and T-tests

were utilized to determine levels of significance between homeless

and nonhomeless parenting stress scores. The preset level of

significance was .05. A total sample size of 28 was analyzed.



Findings indicated that while the T-test for the PSI total scores

only tended towards significance, 25 percent of homeless parents

are at risk for dysfunctional parenting behaviors, and of these 18

percent exceeded the threshold score indicating a need to be

referred for assistance. Despite the lack of statistical

significance of the child and parent domain total scores, the

researcher found that the subscales acceptability and demandingness

were significant, while the subscales of adaptability and parent's

sense of competence approached significance. The life stress

scores were found to be statistically significant between homeless

and nonhomeless parents in this study which relates to external

sources of stress upon these families.



Family health nurses can use the findings of this study to identify

sources of parenting stress, especially among homeless families.

This may enable nurses to target appropriate interventions to

improve parenting skills and support and to potentially prevent

dysfunctional parenting behaviors.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParenting stress: Homeless and nonhomeless families with preschoolersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149547-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parenting stress: Homeless and nonhomeless families with preschoolers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brendel, Jacquelyn, MS/MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">ARNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The parenting stress perceptions of homeless and nonhomeless<br/><br/>parents with preschool age children have important implications on<br/><br/>the parent-child relationship. This relationship is examined from<br/><br/>within a family systems and developmental theoretical framework.<br/><br/>Parenting stress perceptions are defined by Abidin (1983) and<br/><br/>operationalized by the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) (Abidin, 1983).<br/><br/>The PSI is a 120 item self-report questionnaire which consists of<br/><br/>a total parenting stress index score, parent domain score, child<br/><br/>domain score, total life stress score. Subscale scores delineate<br/><br/>specific variables within each domain. This study utilized the PSI<br/><br/>to investigate whether there were statistically significant<br/><br/>differences between homeless and nonhomeless parents' perceptions<br/><br/>of parenting stress.<br/><br/><br/><br/>As ex post facto design was utilized to collect questionnaire data<br/><br/>from homeless parents with preschoolers residing in a homeless<br/><br/>family shelter and from nonhomeless parents with preschoolers<br/><br/>enrolled in an educational child care center. Descriptive<br/><br/>statistics were utilized to examine demographic data and T-tests<br/><br/>were utilized to determine levels of significance between homeless<br/><br/>and nonhomeless parenting stress scores. The preset level of<br/><br/>significance was .05. A total sample size of 28 was analyzed.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings indicated that while the T-test for the PSI total scores<br/><br/>only tended towards significance, 25 percent of homeless parents<br/><br/>are at risk for dysfunctional parenting behaviors, and of these 18<br/><br/>percent exceeded the threshold score indicating a need to be<br/><br/>referred for assistance. Despite the lack of statistical<br/><br/>significance of the child and parent domain total scores, the<br/><br/>researcher found that the subscales acceptability and demandingness<br/><br/>were significant, while the subscales of adaptability and parent's<br/><br/>sense of competence approached significance. The life stress<br/><br/>scores were found to be statistically significant between homeless<br/><br/>and nonhomeless parents in this study which relates to external<br/><br/>sources of stress upon these families.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Family health nurses can use the findings of this study to identify<br/><br/>sources of parenting stress, especially among homeless families.<br/><br/>This may enable nurses to target appropriate interventions to<br/><br/>improve parenting skills and support and to potentially prevent<br/><br/>dysfunctional parenting behaviors.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:04:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:04:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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