2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149548
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Homeless parents perception of parenting stress
Abstract:
Homeless parents perception of parenting stress
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Gorzka, Patricia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Florida
Title:Acting Assistant Dean Students
While homeless parents may be categorized as being at risk for

successful parenting, there is a scarcity of knowledge related to

common or unique problems of these parents. The purpose of this

study was to examine how homeless parents identify their parental

stresses and to determine if a pattern exists of similarities in

the stresses identified by homeless parents. Parenting stress was

defined as those perceptions comprising the combined realms of

child development, parental functioning and stress. The conceptual

framework used to guide this study was Dunst, Trivette, Davis and

Cornwell's (1988) model of enabling and empowering families. This

model proposes a proactive posture in which clients are enabled to

identify their own needs and empowered through the acquisition of

competencies necessary to solve their problems or meet their needs.



A sample of 47 parents (n=30 mothers, n=17 fathers) was obtained

from an emergency shelter for homeless families located in a

metropolitan area of central Florida. Subjects completed a

demographic data questionnaire which provided information such as

age, sex number of children and number of days of homelessness.

Parenting stress was measured by the Parenting Stress Index (PSI),

a 120-item tool completed by the parents. It measured three areas

of perceived stress; child characteristics, parent characteristics

and situational, demographic life stress.



T-tests were calculated for each area. Only the Parental Domain

subscale of Competence was significant. Homeless fathers

identified Social Isolation as the most frequent source of parent

domain stress. High scores in social isolation indicate a need for

intervention programs. Competence and Relationship with Spouse

tied in frequency as the second source of stress for fathers.

Homeless mothers identified Attachment or lack of emotional

closeness to their child as the most frequently occurring source of

parental stress. Social Isolation and Parental Health tied in

frequency as the second source of stress for mothers.



Both homeless mothers and fathers identified the Child Domain as

the most frequent source of parenting stress. Fathers identified

the specific child characteristics of Adaptability or the child's

inability to adjust to changes in the physical or social

environment as the most frequent source of specific stress.

Homeless mothers identified the child characteristic of

Distractibility as the most frequently occurring source of parental

stress. This subscale is associated with children who are

overactive and restless.



While there was no significant difference in the PSI total scores

between homeless mothers and fathers, both groups demonstrated

scores which placed members at risk for dysfunctional parenting.

Homeless mothers had a greater frequency and percentage of total

PSI scores indicative of the risk of dysfunctional parenting than

did homeless fathers. Homeless fathers had the greatest frequency

and highest percentage of high or at risk scores in both the Child

and Parent Domains.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHomeless parents perception of parenting stressen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149548-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Homeless parents perception of parenting stress</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gorzka, Patricia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Acting Assistant Dean Students</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">While homeless parents may be categorized as being at risk for<br/><br/>successful parenting, there is a scarcity of knowledge related to<br/><br/>common or unique problems of these parents. The purpose of this<br/><br/>study was to examine how homeless parents identify their parental<br/><br/>stresses and to determine if a pattern exists of similarities in<br/><br/>the stresses identified by homeless parents. Parenting stress was<br/><br/>defined as those perceptions comprising the combined realms of<br/><br/>child development, parental functioning and stress. The conceptual<br/><br/>framework used to guide this study was Dunst, Trivette, Davis and<br/><br/>Cornwell's (1988) model of enabling and empowering families. This<br/><br/>model proposes a proactive posture in which clients are enabled to<br/><br/>identify their own needs and empowered through the acquisition of<br/><br/>competencies necessary to solve their problems or meet their needs.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A sample of 47 parents (n=30 mothers, n=17 fathers) was obtained<br/><br/>from an emergency shelter for homeless families located in a<br/><br/>metropolitan area of central Florida. Subjects completed a<br/><br/>demographic data questionnaire which provided information such as<br/><br/>age, sex number of children and number of days of homelessness.<br/><br/>Parenting stress was measured by the Parenting Stress Index (PSI),<br/><br/>a 120-item tool completed by the parents. It measured three areas<br/><br/>of perceived stress; child characteristics, parent characteristics<br/><br/>and situational, demographic life stress.<br/><br/><br/><br/>T-tests were calculated for each area. Only the Parental Domain<br/><br/>subscale of Competence was significant. Homeless fathers<br/><br/>identified Social Isolation as the most frequent source of parent<br/><br/>domain stress. High scores in social isolation indicate a need for<br/><br/>intervention programs. Competence and Relationship with Spouse<br/><br/>tied in frequency as the second source of stress for fathers.<br/><br/>Homeless mothers identified Attachment or lack of emotional<br/><br/>closeness to their child as the most frequently occurring source of<br/><br/>parental stress. Social Isolation and Parental Health tied in<br/><br/>frequency as the second source of stress for mothers.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Both homeless mothers and fathers identified the Child Domain as<br/><br/>the most frequent source of parenting stress. Fathers identified<br/><br/>the specific child characteristics of Adaptability or the child's<br/><br/>inability to adjust to changes in the physical or social<br/><br/>environment as the most frequent source of specific stress.<br/><br/>Homeless mothers identified the child characteristic of<br/><br/>Distractibility as the most frequently occurring source of parental<br/><br/>stress. This subscale is associated with children who are<br/><br/>overactive and restless.<br/><br/><br/><br/>While there was no significant difference in the PSI total scores<br/><br/>between homeless mothers and fathers, both groups demonstrated<br/><br/>scores which placed members at risk for dysfunctional parenting.<br/><br/>Homeless mothers had a greater frequency and percentage of total<br/><br/>PSI scores indicative of the risk of dysfunctional parenting than<br/><br/>did homeless fathers. Homeless fathers had the greatest frequency<br/><br/>and highest percentage of high or at risk scores in both the Child<br/><br/>and Parent Domains.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:04:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:04:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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