Perinatal nutritional needs of Punjabi speaking immigrant women living in Surrey, British Columbia

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149554
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perinatal nutritional needs of Punjabi speaking immigrant women living in Surrey, British Columbia
Abstract:
Perinatal nutritional needs of Punjabi speaking immigrant women living in Surrey, British Columbia
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Palmer, Lynne, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Surrey Memorial Hospital
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist
Co-Authors:Patricia A. Janssen, RN, PhD
[Special invitation presentation] The incidence of low birth weight babies in British Columbia is known to be greater in the South Asian population in comparison to British Columbian birth weight standards. Surrey, British Columbia is home to the highest proportion of South Asian immigrants in any metropolitan census of Canada, and almost half of the 3700 women who give birth at Surrey Memorial Hospital are Punjabi speaking women of South Asian descent. Pregnancy and childbirth are strongly associated with cultural traditions and dietary practices that can have a significant impact on maternal-infant health. Intrauterine growth restriction is associated with increased antenatal surveillance, cesarean section rate, and neonatal intensive care unit admissions. Intrauterine growth restriction is also associated with childhood developmental delay and insulin resistance which may lead to adult chronic disease. Punjabi speaking immigrant women often begin their pregnancies with a low body mass index and they gain weight slowly throughout pregnancy. These women experience many barriers to achieving an optimal perinatal diet that would support their own nutritional needs and those of their growing fetuses. A Punjabi speaking women's group participated in planning interventions to increase community awareness of these barriers and to improve their perinatal nutrition. This phase of community involvement will lead to program planning and research designed to evaluate interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerinatal nutritional needs of Punjabi speaking immigrant women living in Surrey, British Columbiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149554-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perinatal nutritional needs of Punjabi speaking immigrant women living in Surrey, British Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Palmer, Lynne, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Surrey Memorial Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynne.palmer@fraserhealth.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia A. Janssen, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Special invitation presentation] The incidence of low birth weight babies in British Columbia is known to be greater in the South Asian population in comparison to British Columbian birth weight standards. Surrey, British Columbia is home to the highest proportion of&nbsp;South Asian immigrants in any metropolitan census of Canada, and almost half of the 3700 women who give birth at Surrey Memorial Hospital are Punjabi speaking women of South Asian descent. Pregnancy and childbirth are strongly associated with cultural traditions and dietary practices that can have a significant impact on maternal-infant health. Intrauterine growth restriction is associated with increased antenatal surveillance, cesarean section rate, and neonatal intensive care unit admissions. Intrauterine growth restriction is also associated with childhood developmental delay and insulin resistance which may lead to adult chronic disease. Punjabi speaking immigrant women often begin their pregnancies with a low body mass index and they gain weight slowly throughout pregnancy. These women experience many barriers to achieving an optimal perinatal diet that would support their own nutritional needs and those of their growing fetuses. A Punjabi speaking women's group participated in planning&nbsp;interventions to increase community awareness of&nbsp;these barriers and to improve their perinatal nutrition. This phase of community involvement will lead to&nbsp;program planning and research designed to evaluate interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:04:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:04:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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