Evaluation of the Safeguard Manual Assist Technique in Reducing Active Hold Time

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149568
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of the Safeguard Manual Assist Technique in Reducing Active Hold Time
Abstract:
Evaluation of the Safeguard Manual Assist Technique in Reducing Active Hold Time
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Roberts, Anthony, MBA, MSN, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Clarian North Medical Center and Anderson University
Title:Director of Cardiovascular Service Line and Critical Care Service
Special invitation presentation] To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Safeguard Manual Assist Technique in reducing active compression time after percutaneous femoral approach in comparison to historical manual compression data.  After using the Safeguard dressing for secondary hemostasis it was discovered by clinicians that the dressing had potential to be used as a means to establish primary hemostasis. Results from the study will be compared to historical data. Primary Investigators: Anthony Roberts Clarian North Medical Center, Dr. Harlamert The Indiana Heart Hospital and Dr. Collins Michigan Cardiovascular Institute. The protocol was funded by the Datascope Corporation and data from St. Mary?s of Michigan was obtained from Datascope Corporation. The SMAT study was a prospective, nonrandomized, multi-center trial of patients that had a procedure via the percutaneous femoral approach.  A total of 101 patients were studied, 65 patients at The Indiana Heart Hospital, and 36 patients at St. Mary?s of Michigan. Active compression was held over the inflated bulb for 5 minutes for diagnostic and 10 minutes for intervention patients. Follow up telephone calls were made 24-48 hours after discharge.  The mean time from the historical data for active compression was 28 minutes. For the differences in safety of the 85 patients in the RACE study there were two patients that experienced a major complication. Effectiveness findings revealed active compression time in minutes for all patients (N=100) to be 7.7+/- 3.3 [p<0.0001].  Diagnostic patients (N=72) active compression time in minutes 6.6 +/- 2.9 [p<0.0001].  Intervention patients (N=28) 10.5+/- 2.5 [p<0.0001]. Safety findings revealed all patients (N=101) major complications rate of 1 (1.01%) required vascular repair or the need for vascular repair (via ultrasound guided intervention, surgery, transcatheter embolization, or stent graft).  Safeguard Manual Assist Technique is safe and effective in reducing active compression time in patients that have undergone a diagnostic or interventional procedure via the percutaneous femoral approach.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of the Safeguard Manual Assist Technique in Reducing Active Hold Timeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149568-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of the Safeguard Manual Assist Technique in Reducing Active Hold Time</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roberts, Anthony, MBA, MSN, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Clarian North Medical Center and Anderson University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Cardiovascular Service Line and Critical Care Service</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">arobert3@clarian.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Special invitation presentation] To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Safeguard Manual Assist Technique in reducing active compression time after percutaneous femoral approach in comparison to historical manual compression data.&nbsp; After using the Safeguard dressing for secondary hemostasis it was discovered by clinicians that the dressing had potential to be used as a means to establish primary hemostasis. Results from the study will be compared to historical data. Primary Investigators:&nbsp;Anthony Roberts Clarian North Medical Center, Dr. Harlamert The Indiana Heart Hospital and Dr. Collins Michigan Cardiovascular Institute.&nbsp;The protocol was funded by the Datascope Corporation and data from St. Mary?s of Michigan was obtained from Datascope Corporation. The SMAT study was a prospective, nonrandomized, multi-center trial of patients that had a procedure via the percutaneous femoral approach.&nbsp; A total of 101 patients were studied, 65 patients at The Indiana Heart Hospital, and 36 patients at St. Mary?s of Michigan.&nbsp;Active compression was held over the inflated bulb for 5 minutes for diagnostic and 10 minutes for intervention patients.&nbsp;Follow up telephone calls were made 24-48 hours after discharge.&nbsp; The mean time from the historical data for active compression was 28 minutes.&nbsp;For the differences in safety of the 85 patients in the RACE study there were two patients that experienced a major complication. Effectiveness findings revealed active compression time in minutes for all patients (N=100) to be 7.7+/- 3.3 [p&lt;0.0001].&nbsp; Diagnostic patients (N=72) active compression time in minutes 6.6 +/- 2.9 [p&lt;0.0001].&nbsp; Intervention patients (N=28) 10.5+/- 2.5 [p&lt;0.0001]. Safety findings revealed all patients (N=101) major complications rate of 1 (1.01%) required vascular repair or the need for vascular repair (via ultrasound guided intervention, surgery, transcatheter embolization, or stent graft). &nbsp;Safeguard Manual Assist Technique is safe and effective in reducing active compression time in patients that have undergone a diagnostic or interventional procedure via the percutaneous femoral approach.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:05:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:05:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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