Research Issues: Combining Ethics and Economics in the Recruitment of Parents of Young Children for Intervention Research

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149595
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Research Issues: Combining Ethics and Economics in the Recruitment of Parents of Young Children for Intervention Research
Abstract:
Research Issues: Combining Ethics and Economics in the Recruitment of Parents of Young Children for Intervention Research
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Stamler, Lynnette Leeseberg, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Saskatchewan
Co-Authors:Linda J. Patrick, RN, BScN, MA, MSc, PhD; Kristin Knibbs, RN, MN; Joanne Boyer, RN, BScN; Anne W. Snowdon, RN, PhD
[Scientific session research presentation] Ethical recruitment of participants for research has long been a focus for researchers. A glance through the recent research ethics literature reveals articles examining issues related to recruitment of children, persons with chronic diseases and other vulnerable populations. Despite these issues, there continues to exist a strong desire for increased intervention research, which contributes to evidence-informed practice. Parents of young healthy children are rarely included in descriptions of vulnerable populations. However, in recent research studies examining knowledge and attitudes regarding child automotive safety, and continuing research testing an intervention based on that knowledge and those attitudes, the enrolment of  busy parents was difficult. One reason for this may be issues of social desirability ? do the parents fear learning that they are, in fact, making less than optimal decisions regarding the safety of their children? In addition, economics comes into the equation when one examines the cost of communicating with large numbers of parents from a variety of sites with the disappointing result of a small response rate. This can be exacerbated when the cost of the intervention is high and funding is limited.  Our experiences caused us to reconsider this population as a possible vulnerable population, and examine factors influencing our recruitment processes. In this presentation we focus on the difficulties encountered during the research process, strategies employed to ensure a representative group of parents recruited in an ethical manner and the exploration of this population as vulnerable.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResearch Issues: Combining Ethics and Economics in the Recruitment of Parents of Young Children for Intervention Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149595-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Research Issues: Combining Ethics and Economics in the Recruitment of Parents of Young Children for Intervention Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stamler, Lynnette Leeseberg, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Saskatchewan</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynnette.stamler@usask.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda J. Patrick, RN, BScN, MA, MSc, PhD; Kristin Knibbs, RN, MN; Joanne Boyer, RN, BScN; Anne W. Snowdon, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Ethical recruitment of participants for research has long been a focus for researchers. A glance through the recent research ethics literature reveals articles examining issues related to recruitment of children, persons with chronic diseases and other vulnerable populations. Despite these issues, there continues to exist a strong desire for increased intervention research, which contributes to evidence-informed practice. Parents of young healthy children are rarely included in descriptions of vulnerable populations. However, in recent research studies examining knowledge and attitudes regarding child automotive safety, and continuing research testing an intervention based on that knowledge and those attitudes, the enrolment of &nbsp;busy parents was difficult. One reason for this may be issues of social desirability ? do the parents fear learning that they are, in fact, making less than optimal decisions regarding the safety of their children? In addition, economics comes into the equation when one examines the cost of communicating with large numbers of parents from a variety of sites with the disappointing result of a small response rate. This can be exacerbated when the cost of the intervention is high and funding is limited.&nbsp; Our experiences caused us to reconsider this population as a possible vulnerable population, and examine factors influencing our recruitment processes. In this presentation we focus on the difficulties encountered during the research process, strategies employed to ensure a representative group of parents recruited in an ethical manner and the exploration of this population as vulnerable.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:05:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:05:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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