Perspectives of Somali Refugee Women Living in the U.S.: Why Are You So Interested in Our Circumcision?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149613
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perspectives of Somali Refugee Women Living in the U.S.: Why Are You So Interested in Our Circumcision?
Abstract:
Perspectives of Somali Refugee Women Living in the U.S.: Why Are You So Interested in Our Circumcision?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Upvall, Michele, PhD, CRNP
P.I. Institution Name:Carlow University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Khadra Mohammed, BS; Pamela Dodge, RN, MSN
[Clinical session research presentation] Approximately 180 Somali refugees were resettled in southwestern Pennsylvania from February 2004 to April 2005 after living in Kenyan refugees camps for over 10 years. The Somali refugee women experienced infibulation, a severe type of female circumcision (FC) as young children. FC presents an additional challenge for these women who are adjusting to a new environment. The objective of this study was to facilitate culturally competent, quality health care for circumcised Somali refugee women.  A purposive, inclusive sample of 23 resettled Somali women participated in a focus group session for data collection. Interviews with of registered nurses and physicians who have provided care to the women were conducted. Verbatim audio taped transcripts from the focus groups were coded into primary and secondary levels. The software package, Altas.Ti, was used to manage the data with interpretation agreed upon by the research team. Results indicated that for the Somali refugee women, being circumcised and living with its consequences is a part of their everyday experience. Not being circumcised is an alien concept, separating the Somali women from US-born women. Implications for development of culturally competent healthcare providers includes NOT focusing on the circumcision and being accepting of the Somali women regardless of anatomical difference. In addition, providers must develop their skills in working with interpreters, allow and promote the interaction with other Somali women accompanying the client for the visit or hospital stay. Finally, healthcare providers must take responsibility for acquiring knowledge of the Somali women?s challenges as refugees and as immigrants in need of healthcare services.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerspectives of Somali Refugee Women Living in the U.S.: Why Are You So Interested in Our Circumcision?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149613-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perspectives of Somali Refugee Women Living in the U.S.: Why Are You So Interested in Our Circumcision?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Upvall, Michele, PhD, CRNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Carlow University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">upvallmj@carlow.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Khadra Mohammed, BS; Pamela Dodge, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Approximately 180 Somali refugees were resettled in southwestern Pennsylvania from February 2004 to April 2005 after living in Kenyan refugees camps for over 10 years. The Somali refugee women experienced infibulation, a severe type of female circumcision (FC) as young children. FC presents an additional challenge for these women who are adjusting to a new environment. The objective of this study was to facilitate culturally competent, quality health care for circumcised Somali refugee women.&nbsp; A purposive, inclusive sample of 23 resettled Somali women participated in a focus group session for data collection. Interviews with of registered nurses and physicians who have provided care to the women were conducted. Verbatim audio taped transcripts from the focus groups were coded into primary and secondary levels. The software package, Altas.Ti, was used to manage the data with interpretation agreed upon by the research team. Results indicated that for the Somali refugee women, being circumcised and living with its consequences is a part of their everyday experience. Not being circumcised is an alien concept, separating the Somali women from US-born women. Implications for development of culturally competent healthcare providers includes NOT focusing on the circumcision and being accepting of the Somali women regardless of anatomical difference. In addition, providers must develop their skills in working with interpreters, allow and promote the interaction with other Somali women accompanying the client for the visit or hospital stay. Finally, healthcare providers must take responsibility for acquiring knowledge of the Somali women?s challenges as refugees and as immigrants in need of healthcare services.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:05:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:05:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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