An Alternative Clinical Experience: Undergraduate Nursing Students and the Lived Experience of Vulnerable Populations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149623
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Alternative Clinical Experience: Undergraduate Nursing Students and the Lived Experience of Vulnerable Populations
Abstract:
An Alternative Clinical Experience: Undergraduate Nursing Students and the Lived Experience of Vulnerable Populations
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Wallace, Sharon, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Jefferson School of Nursing, Jefferson College of Health Professions, Thomas Jefferson University
Title:Assistant Dean, Senior Level, Instructor
Co-Authors:Karen A. Papastrat, MSN, RN; Thomas Loveless, MSN, CRNP; Mary Powell, PhD, ANP; Sharon Burke, MSN, RN-C
[Symposium scientific presentation] For many nursing students, interacting with vulnerable populations in a health care setting is a new experience, yet the concept of vulnerability is established prior to embarking on a nursing education. Vulnerability is linked to increased risk and lack of protection, as well as a variety of attributes which tend to be stigmatizing. However, a truer essence of vulnerability suggests the potential for negative or positive outcomes, which the nurse must consider in planning optimal patient care. Alternative clinical experiences (ACE) were designed to introduce students to vulnerable populations, free of role context, and to foster recognition of the multidimensional aspects of vulnerability. Jefferson School of Nursing faculty established an ACE program for each clinical rotation. The introductory medical-surgical rotation included care of patients with HIV/AIDs and cancer. Patients and families living with HIV/AIDS and cancer told stories of their experiences and participated in a question and answer session. One patient described finding the dignity to ask for what she wanted, "a clean gown, something for pain, and a nurse to hold my hand". The vulnerability of illiteracy, women with heart disease, survivors of rape, and family members of critically ill patients has been explored in the ACE programs throughout the curriculum. Students indicated that they were better able to understand, appreciate, and empathize with vulnerable populations. They regarded the communication to be "immediately relevant and meaningful", which enabled them "to view the world differently." Exposure to vulnerable populations in an alternative clinical setting has provided an opportunity for students to experience the humanity of vulnerable populations through story telling and interaction. The ACE programs have broadened the educational experience of undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students at Jefferson School of Nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Alternative Clinical Experience: Undergraduate Nursing Students and the Lived Experience of Vulnerable Populationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149623-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Alternative Clinical Experience: Undergraduate Nursing Students and the Lived Experience of Vulnerable Populations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wallace, Sharon, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Jefferson School of Nursing, Jefferson College of Health Professions, Thomas Jefferson University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Dean, Senior Level, Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sharon.wallace@jefferson.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen A. Papastrat, MSN, RN; Thomas Loveless, MSN, CRNP; Mary Powell, PhD, ANP; Sharon Burke, MSN, RN-C</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium scientific presentation] For many nursing students, interacting with vulnerable populations in a health care setting is a new experience, yet the concept of vulnerability is established prior to embarking on a nursing education. Vulnerability is linked to increased risk and lack of protection, as well as a variety of attributes which tend to be stigmatizing. However, a truer essence of vulnerability suggests the potential for negative or positive outcomes, which the nurse must consider in planning optimal patient care. Alternative clinical experiences (ACE) were designed to introduce students to vulnerable populations, free of role context, and to foster recognition of the multidimensional aspects of vulnerability. Jefferson School of Nursing faculty established an ACE program for each clinical rotation. The introductory medical-surgical rotation included care of patients with HIV/AIDs and cancer. Patients and families living with HIV/AIDS and cancer told stories of their experiences and participated in a question and answer session. One patient described finding the dignity to ask for what she wanted, &quot;a clean gown, something for pain, and a nurse to hold my hand&quot;. The vulnerability of illiteracy, women with heart disease, survivors of rape, and family members of critically ill patients has been explored in the ACE programs throughout the curriculum. Students indicated that they were better able to understand, appreciate, and empathize with vulnerable populations. They regarded the communication to be &quot;immediately relevant and meaningful&quot;, which enabled them &quot;to view the world differently.&quot; Exposure to vulnerable populations in an alternative clinical setting has provided an opportunity for students to experience the humanity of vulnerable populations through story telling and interaction. The ACE programs have broadened the educational experience of undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students at Jefferson School of Nursing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:06:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:06:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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