2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149630
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Leading an Empowered Organization
Abstract:
Leading an Empowered Organization
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Wessel, Susan, RN, MS, MBA, CNAA
P.I. Institution Name:Creative Health Care Management
Title:Consultant
[Leadership session research presentation] Leading An Empowered Organization (LEO) has provided healthcare leaders an effective model for improving their own organizational effectiveness and for empowering their staff. LEO has been presented to staff and leaders in several countries including China, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Over 100,000 nurses in the United Kingdom have completed LEO training and it is credited as a major element in the modernization of the National Health Service, preparing nurses to take ownership of their practice and lead change on their wards. In the US, hospitals of all sizes have used LEO to change the leadership culture and enhance the professional practice of nurses.The LEO model builds competence in essential leadership skills including: articulating expectations, accepting responsibility, authority and accountability, relationship management, risk taking, and problem solving. The outcome is an environment in which:Collaborative leadership establishes a climate that is relatively free of power-based constraints and all members feel they share equally in opportunities for influencing the direction of group effortCommunication is flexible so that all members participate equally and minority opinions are encouraged and can be voiced. A cooperative problem solving approach avoids 'win-loose' so that people become more sensitive to the ideas and reactions of others. Staff learn to deal openly and candidly with one another so that personal needs do not distort the situation and issues can be discussed and resolved as they surface. Decision techniques favor sharing responsibility among all involved to that all members feel a sense of responsibility for group success. This session will introduce the LEO model and how it can be used to improve leadership effectiveness and to prepare hospitals and schools of nursing for shared governance and staff autonomy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLeading an Empowered Organizationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149630-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Leading an Empowered Organization</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wessel, Susan, RN, MS, MBA, CNAA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Creative Health Care Management</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Consultant</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">phillips@chcm.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Leadership session research presentation] Leading An Empowered Organization (LEO) has provided healthcare leaders an effective model for improving their own organizational effectiveness and for empowering their staff. LEO has been presented to staff and leaders in several countries including China, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Over 100,000 nurses in the United Kingdom have completed LEO training and it is credited as a major element in the modernization of the National Health Service, preparing nurses to take ownership of their practice and lead change on their wards.&nbsp;In the US, hospitals of all sizes have used LEO to change the leadership culture and enhance the professional practice of nurses.The LEO model builds competence in essential leadership skills including: articulating expectations, accepting responsibility, authority and accountability, relationship management, risk taking, and problem solving.&nbsp;The outcome is an environment in which:Collaborative leadership establishes a climate that is relatively free of power-based constraints and all members feel they share equally in opportunities for influencing the direction of group effortCommunication is flexible so that all members participate equally and minority opinions are encouraged and can be voiced. A cooperative problem solving approach avoids 'win-loose' so that people become more sensitive to the ideas and reactions of others. Staff learn to deal openly and candidly with one another so that personal needs do not distort the situation and issues can be discussed and resolved as they surface. Decision techniques favor sharing responsibility among all involved to that all members feel a sense of responsibility for group success. This session will introduce the LEO model and how it can be used to improve leadership effectiveness and to prepare hospitals and schools of nursing for shared governance and staff autonomy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:06:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:06:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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