How Perioperative Nurses Define, Attribute Causes of, and React to Intraoperative Nursing Errors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149679
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Perioperative Nurses Define, Attribute Causes of, and React to Intraoperative Nursing Errors
Abstract:
How Perioperative Nurses Define, Attribute Causes of, and React to Intraoperative Nursing Errors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Chard, Robin, PhD, RN, CNOR
P.I. Institution Name:Florida International University
Title:Clinical Assistant Professor
[Scientific session research presentation] Errors in nursing practice are a growing concern in healthcare posing a threat to patient safety. Practitioners have been hesitant to come forward and report errors because of negative ramifications in the workplace. The purpose of this study was to examine the definitions, circumstances, perceived causes, and reactions of perioperative nurses to intraoperative nursing error; and examine the relationships among coping with intraoperative nursing errors, emotional distress, and changes in practice due to error. The conceptual framework that guided this study was Lazarus and Folkman?s (1984) cognitive theory of psychological stress and coping. The method was a descriptive, correlational design using a survey to obtain information. Perioperative registered nurses (N=272) who were members of the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) participated in the study. From this sample, 158 participants admitted to committing an intraoperative nursing error. Results showed that nurses who used accepting responsibility as a coping strategy after committing an error tended to experience high levels of emotional distress. Relationships were shown between the strategy of planful problem solving with constructive changes in practice, and the strategy of escape-avoidance with defensive changes in practice. Using multiple regression analysis, the strategies of accepting responsibility and using self-control were found to be significant predictors of emotional distress. Seeking social support and planful problem solving emerged as significant predictors of constructive changes in practice. The most predictive of defensive changes was the strategy of escape-avoidance. Outcomes that are identified from the process of error management should include measures intended to promote learning from the error and interventions designed to prevent future errors. This study provided evidence that perioperative nurses experienced a variety of emotions after committing an error which led to alterations in the way they practiced.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Perioperative Nurses Define, Attribute Causes of, and React to Intraoperative Nursing Errorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149679-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How Perioperative Nurses Define, Attribute Causes of, and React to Intraoperative Nursing Errors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chard, Robin, PhD, RN, CNOR</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida International University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rrchard@mindspring.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Errors in nursing practice are a growing concern in healthcare posing a threat to patient safety. Practitioners have been hesitant to come forward and report errors because of negative ramifications in the workplace. The purpose of this study was to examine the definitions, circumstances, perceived causes, and reactions of perioperative nurses to intraoperative nursing error; and examine the relationships among coping with intraoperative nursing errors, emotional distress, and changes in practice due to error. The conceptual framework that guided this study was Lazarus and Folkman?s (1984) cognitive theory of psychological stress and coping. The method was a descriptive, correlational design using a survey to obtain information. Perioperative registered nurses (N=272) who were members of the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) participated in the study. From this sample, 158 participants admitted to committing an intraoperative nursing error. Results showed that nurses who used accepting responsibility as a coping strategy after committing an error tended to experience high levels of emotional distress. Relationships were shown between the strategy of planful problem solving with constructive changes in practice, and the strategy of escape-avoidance with defensive changes in practice. Using multiple regression analysis, the strategies of accepting responsibility and using self-control were found to be significant predictors of emotional distress. Seeking social support and planful problem solving emerged as significant predictors of constructive changes in practice. The most predictive of defensive changes was the strategy of escape-avoidance. Outcomes that are identified from the process of error management should include measures intended to promote learning from the error and interventions designed to prevent future errors. This study provided evidence that perioperative nurses experienced a variety of emotions after committing an error which led to alterations in the way they practiced.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:07:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:07:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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