Comparing the Risk for Developing Nosocomial Infections during the SARS and Pre-SARS Periods in a Canadian Hospital Setting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149702
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparing the Risk for Developing Nosocomial Infections during the SARS and Pre-SARS Periods in a Canadian Hospital Setting
Abstract:
Comparing the Risk for Developing Nosocomial Infections during the SARS and Pre-SARS Periods in a Canadian Hospital Setting
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Fox-Wasylyshyn, Susan M., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Windsor
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Maher M. El-Masri, RN, PhD; Margaret (Peggy) Oldfield, MSc, BA, RN
[Scientific session research presentation] Background: Proper hand hygiene and adherence to standard precautions are the simplest and most cost-effective approach to prevent nosocomial infections. However, compliance with recommended hand-washing practices remains unacceptably low, and ranges from 10 to 60%. The SARS outbreak prompted unprecedented adherence to infection control practices in Canada, providing a rare opportunity to examine the impact of such adherence on the risk for developing nosocomial infections. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to the risk for developing nosocomial infections between the SARS and pre-SARS periods. Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted on a sample of 200 randomly selected ICU patients in southwestern Ontario. Patients who qualified for the study were admitted to the ICU three months before SARS (controls), or during the SARS outbreak (cases). All study participants were deemed to be infection-free at the time of admission. Results: Logistic regression analysis suggested that the odds of developing infection were 5 times higher in the pre-SARS period than during the SARS outbreak (OR, 5.13, P = .025). Blood transfusion (OR = 2.05, P = .024) and mechanical ventilation (OR = 11.8, P = .004) were also independent predictors of nosocomial infections. Conclusion: The findings imply that strict adherence to infection control practices that occurred during the SARS outbreak in Canada contributed to a significant reduction in the risk for developing nosocomial infections.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparing the Risk for Developing Nosocomial Infections during the SARS and Pre-SARS Periods in a Canadian Hospital Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149702-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparing the Risk for Developing Nosocomial Infections during the SARS and Pre-SARS Periods in a Canadian Hospital Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fox-Wasylyshyn, Susan M., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Windsor</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sfox@uwindsor.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Maher M. El-Masri, RN, PhD; Margaret (Peggy) Oldfield, MSc, BA, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Background: Proper hand hygiene and adherence to standard precautions are the simplest and most cost-effective approach to prevent nosocomial infections. However, compliance with recommended hand-washing practices remains unacceptably low, and ranges from 10 to 60%. The SARS outbreak prompted unprecedented adherence to infection control practices in Canada, providing a rare opportunity to examine the impact of such adherence on the risk for developing nosocomial infections. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to the risk for developing nosocomial infections between the SARS and pre-SARS periods. Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted on a sample of 200 randomly selected ICU patients in southwestern Ontario. Patients who qualified for the study were admitted to the ICU three months before SARS (controls), or during the SARS outbreak (cases). All study participants were deemed to be infection-free at the time of admission. Results: Logistic regression analysis suggested that the odds of developing infection were 5 times higher in the pre-SARS period than during the SARS outbreak (OR, 5.13, P = .025). Blood transfusion (OR = 2.05, P = .024) and mechanical ventilation (OR = 11.8, P = .004) were also independent predictors of nosocomial infections. Conclusion: The findings imply that strict adherence to infection control practices that occurred during the SARS outbreak in Canada contributed to a significant reduction in the risk for developing nosocomial infections.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:07:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:07:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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