Provider Recommendation and Patient Behaviors Predicting Colorectal Cancer Screening Completion in African-Americans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149719
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Provider Recommendation and Patient Behaviors Predicting Colorectal Cancer Screening Completion in African-Americans
Abstract:
Provider Recommendation and Patient Behaviors Predicting Colorectal Cancer Screening Completion in African-Americans
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Griffith, Kathleen A., PhD, CRNP
P.I. Institution Name:Johns Hopkins University
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Co-Authors:Renee Royak-Schaler, PhD, MEd
[Scientific session research presentation] Background. African Americans (AAs) are more likely to develop and die from colorectal cancer (CRC) than any other racial group. AAs also have low rates of CRC screening, even if they visit healthcare providers (HCPs) regularly. This study investigated predictors of timely CRC screening (completion of risk-appropriate tests within a recommended time frame) in AA Maryland residents, (superscript 3) 40 years, with and without family histories of CRC.  Methods. Using the Biopsychosocial Model framework, forward and backward stepwise logistic regression analyses were done using data from 580 AA participants in the 2002 Maryland Cancer Survey. Social (education, employment, insurance, access to HCP, and HCP recommendation of fecal occult blood test [FOBT] and/or sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy);  biological  (age, gender, CRC family history); and behavioral (e.g. mammogram and prostate specific antigen [PSA] screening history, activity level) predictors of timely CRC screening were evaluated. Results: HCP recommendations of FOBT (OR 11.90, 95% CI: 6.84, 20.71, p<.001) and sigmoidoscopy/colonscopy (OR 7.06, 95% CI 4.11, 12.14, p<.001) predicted screening in subjects without family histories of CRC (n=473).  Those with family histories of CRC (n=86) who received provider recommendations of sigmoidoscopy/colonscopy were over 24 times (95% CI 5.30, 111.34, p<.001) more likely to have timely CRC screening.  Behaviors that predicted CRC screening for individuals without family histories were moderate/vigorous activity (OR 1.70, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.82, p<.01), and PSA screening (OR 2.81, 95% CI 1.01, 7.81, p<.01).  Those with family histories who engaged in vigorous physical activity were 5.21 times (95% CI: 1.09, 24.88, p<.001) more likely to have obtained timely CRC screening. Conclusions.  HCP recommendations strongly predicted CRC screening for AAs with and without family histories of CRC.  However, provider rationale for recommending particular types of CRC testing and factors associated with patient adherence to recommendations were beyond the scope of this study, warranting further investigation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProvider Recommendation and Patient Behaviors Predicting Colorectal Cancer Screening Completion in African-Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149719-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Provider Recommendation and Patient Behaviors Predicting Colorectal Cancer Screening Completion in African-Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Griffith, Kathleen A., PhD, CRNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Johns Hopkins University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">griffith@son.jhmi.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Renee Royak-Schaler, PhD, MEd</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Background.&nbsp;African Americans (AAs) are more likely to develop and die from colorectal cancer (CRC) than any other racial group.&nbsp;AAs also have low rates of CRC screening, even if they visit healthcare providers (HCPs) regularly. This study investigated predictors of timely CRC screening (completion of risk-appropriate tests within a recommended time frame) in AA Maryland residents, (superscript 3) 40 years, with and without family histories of CRC.&nbsp; Methods. Using the Biopsychosocial Model framework, forward and backward stepwise logistic regression analyses were done using data from 580 AA participants in the 2002 Maryland Cancer Survey.&nbsp;Social (education, employment, insurance, access to HCP, and HCP recommendation of fecal occult blood test [FOBT] and/or sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy);&nbsp; biological&nbsp; (age, gender, CRC family history); and behavioral (e.g. mammogram and prostate specific antigen [PSA] screening history, activity level) predictors of timely CRC screening were evaluated. Results: HCP recommendations of FOBT (OR 11.90, 95% CI: 6.84, 20.71, p&lt;.001) and sigmoidoscopy/colonscopy (OR 7.06, 95% CI 4.11, 12.14, p&lt;.001) predicted screening in subjects without family histories of CRC (n=473).&nbsp; Those with family histories of CRC (n=86) who received provider recommendations of sigmoidoscopy/colonscopy were over 24 times (95% CI 5.30, 111.34, p&lt;.001) more likely to have timely CRC screening.&nbsp; Behaviors that predicted CRC screening for individuals without family histories were moderate/vigorous activity (OR 1.70, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.82, p&lt;.01), and PSA screening (OR 2.81, 95% CI 1.01, 7.81, p&lt;.01).&nbsp; Those with family histories who engaged in vigorous physical activity were 5.21 times (95% CI: 1.09, 24.88, p&lt;.001) more likely to have obtained timely CRC screening.&nbsp;Conclusions. &nbsp;HCP recommendations strongly predicted CRC screening for AAs with and without family histories of CRC.&nbsp; However, provider rationale for recommending particular types of CRC testing and factors associated with patient&nbsp;adherence to recommendations&nbsp;were beyond the scope of this study, warranting further investigation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:08:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:08:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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