2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149726
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Immigrant Mothers, Language Discordance and Use of "Photovoice"
Abstract:
Immigrant Mothers, Language Discordance and Use of "Photovoice"
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hardie, Catherine, RN, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toronto
Title:Senior Lecturer
Scientific session research presentation] The focus on language abilities as an explanatory model for the marginalization of immigrant women may, in fact, function as a way of obscuring the underlying racism in society and serve as a convenient way to avoid addressing inequity based on ethno-racial minority status. Blackford (2003) speaks of the exclusionary culture of health care, where lack of English facility is but one condition marginalizing minority groups. Language remains a powerful instrument of cultural control, whereby the "imperial centre" installs English as the standard against all other variants (Kirkham, 2003). One of the purposes of this qualitative research study was to examine the major gaps in our understanding of how lack of English facility structured the pediatric hospitalization experience for mothers who were newcomers to Canada and members of ethno-racialized minority groups. The barriers these mothers report related to the quality of their English language skills, their accent or their inability to converse in or understand English within an inpatient hospital setting are examined.. Results suggest that mothers seemed more isolated, more financially strapped as a result of the child's illness, and less familiar with how the system worked. A great deal of their energy and focus was required to simply understand English conversations. Photovoice (defined as a participatory action research methodology (Wang and Pies, 2004)) was utilized in this research where study mothers where given a camera and asked to "capture" meaningful symbols. This research tool proved useful in providing additional understanding of the women's experience "where the thin description of photos is combined with the thick description of written text to create meaning" (Hastrup, 1992). The implications of the refracted gaze and visual imperialism are analyzed with reference to cross cultural research and utility with participants with limited English facility.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImmigrant Mothers, Language Discordance and Use of "Photovoice"en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149726-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Immigrant Mothers, Language Discordance and Use of &quot;Photovoice&quot;</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hardie, Catherine, RN, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toronto</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">c.hardie@utoronto.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Scientific session research presentation] The focus on language abilities as an explanatory model for the marginalization of immigrant women may, in fact, function as a way of obscuring the underlying racism&nbsp;in society and serve as a convenient way to avoid addressing inequity based on ethno-racial minority status. Blackford (2003) speaks of the exclusionary culture of&nbsp;health care, where lack of English facility is but one condition marginalizing minority groups.&nbsp;Language remains a powerful instrument of cultural control, whereby the &quot;imperial centre&quot; installs English as the standard against all other variants (Kirkham, 2003). One of the purposes of this qualitative research study was to examine the major gaps in our understanding of how lack of English facility structured the pediatric hospitalization experience for mothers who were newcomers to Canada and members of ethno-racialized minority groups. The&nbsp;barriers these mothers report related to the quality of their English language skills, their accent or their inability to converse in or understand English within an inpatient hospital setting are examined.. Results suggest that&nbsp;mothers seemed more isolated, more financially strapped as a result of the child's illness, and less familiar&nbsp;with how the system worked. A great deal of their energy and focus was required to simply understand English conversations. Photovoice (defined as a participatory action research methodology (Wang and Pies, 2004)) was utilized in this research where study mothers where given a camera and asked to &quot;capture&quot; meaningful symbols. This research tool proved useful in providing additional understanding of the women's experience &quot;where the thin description of photos is combined with the thick description of written text to create meaning&quot; (Hastrup, 1992). The implications of the refracted gaze and visual imperialism are analyzed with reference to cross cultural research and utility with participants with limited English facility.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:08:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:08:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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