Improving the Safety of Blood Transfusions Using Formal Process Definitions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149730
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving the Safety of Blood Transfusions Using Formal Process Definitions
Abstract:
Improving the Safety of Blood Transfusions Using Formal Process Definitions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Henneman, Elizabeth A., RN, PhD, CCNS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:George S. Avrunin, PhD; Lori Clarke, PhD; Leon Osterweil, PhD; Philip L. Henneman, MD
[Scientific session research presentation] Introduction/Significance: Current methods for improving the safety of blood transfusion in the clinical setting rely on informal process descriptions, such as flow charts and algorithms. Formal process definition is an innovative technique that uses technology based on computer programming languages to define complex processes precisely, clearly, and to any desired level of detail. The resulting process definitions can then be analyzed to identify potential problems and determine whether the process satisfies safety requirements. Methods: We have formally defined the blood transfusion process, including identifying prerequisites that must be satisfied for carrying out each step in the process and ways that the execution of each step could fail. We are also analyzing the formal process definition to determine whether the process satisfies its safety requirements. We are using a tool originally developed for use in checking computer programs for identifying and clarifying ambiguities and omissions in the conventional statements of the safety conditions that the process is intended to enforce. Results: Potential error-prone situations have been identified that had not previously been considered. The majority of these error prone situations are related to patient identification and specimen labeling. Other error-prone situations are those related to provider communication issues related to a suspected transfusion reaction. We have also identified a number of exceptional/non-standard conditions, such as the comatose patient with a missing armband who requires a blood transfusion. Conclusion: Formal process definition allows for the precise representation of the blood transfusion process in both standard and exceptional situations. We are currently in the early stages of using process formalization to improve the safety of blood transfusion. To date, we have focused on eliciting and adequately representing the blood transfusion process. In the future, we will be conducting an evaluation of this formal definition in a simulated clinical setting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving the Safety of Blood Transfusions Using Formal Process Definitionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149730-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improving the Safety of Blood Transfusions Using Formal Process Definitions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Henneman, Elizabeth A., RN, PhD, CCNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Massachusetts, Amherst</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bethann953@aol.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">George S. Avrunin, PhD; Lori Clarke, PhD; Leon Osterweil, PhD; Philip L. Henneman, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Introduction/Significance: Current methods for improving the safety of blood transfusion in the clinical setting rely on informal process descriptions, such as flow charts and algorithms. Formal process definition is an innovative technique that uses technology based on computer programming languages to define complex processes precisely, clearly, and to any desired level of detail. The resulting process definitions can then be analyzed to identify potential problems and determine whether the process satisfies safety requirements.&nbsp;Methods: We have formally defined the blood transfusion process, including identifying prerequisites that must be satisfied for carrying out each step in the process and ways that the execution of each step could fail.&nbsp;We are also analyzing the formal process definition to determine whether the process satisfies its safety requirements. We are using a tool originally developed for use in checking computer programs for identifying and clarifying ambiguities and omissions in the conventional statements of the safety conditions that the process is intended to enforce.&nbsp;Results: Potential error-prone situations have been identified that had not previously been considered. The majority of these error prone situations are related to patient identification and specimen labeling.&nbsp;Other error-prone situations are those related to provider communication issues related to a suspected transfusion reaction.&nbsp;We have also identified a number of exceptional/non-standard conditions, such as the comatose patient with a missing armband who requires a blood transfusion.&nbsp;Conclusion: Formal process definition allows for the precise representation of the blood transfusion process in both standard and exceptional situations. We are currently in the early stages of using process formalization to improve the safety of blood transfusion. To date, we have focused on eliciting and adequately representing the blood transfusion process. In the future, we will be conducting an evaluation of this formal definition in a simulated clinical setting.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:08:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:08:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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