Older Adults' Descriptions of Environmental Factors that Promote a Sense of Autonomy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149732
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older Adults' Descriptions of Environmental Factors that Promote a Sense of Autonomy
Abstract:
Older Adults' Descriptions of Environmental Factors that Promote a Sense of Autonomy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hertz, Judith E., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Illinois University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Jeanette Rossetti, EdD, RN
[Clinical session research presentation] The purpose of this paper is to report findings from interviews with residents of independent living senior apartments in the Midwestern United States; the focus was on factors that influence their choices, personal needs and goals, and feelings of self-direction. The mid-range self-care theory from Modeling and Role-Modeling theory (Erickson et al., 1982) framed the study. From this perspective, perceived enactment of autonomy (PEA) is the feeling that one has choices, personal knowledge of needs and goals, and control over one?s life; it is prerequisite to self-care actions that promote health and quality of life. Older adults? self-care actions to manage health processes when living with chronic illnesses and potential or actual functional declines are poorly understood. Likewise, little is known about specific factors that influence self-care actions, autonomy and quality of life from the perspective of older adults, especially the population who live independently in apartments. To address those gaps and prior to developing theory-based interventions that promote self-care via support for autonomy, interviews were conducted as part of a larger mixed method study. Respondents volunteered for the interview after completing written surveys. They were purposively selected based on age, self-rated health, and gender to obtain diverse views and until data saturation was reached. Ten women and four men aged 67 to 91 years responded to a semi-structured interview guide during a 45-minute taped interview. Traditional thematic analysis (Miles & Huberman, 1994) was used to analyze data. One theme that emerged was external environmental factors as facilitators to PEA; the theme?s subcategories were physical environment, living arrangement and interpersonal environment. These findings form a foundation for designing health promotion interventions through alterations in the environment. Results also have implications for future research, theory development and public policy targeted toward the growing population of older adults.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder Adults' Descriptions of Environmental Factors that Promote a Sense of Autonomyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149732-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Older Adults' Descriptions of Environmental Factors that Promote a Sense of Autonomy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hertz, Judith E., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Illinois University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jhertz@niu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jeanette Rossetti, EdD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] The purpose of this paper is to report findings from interviews with residents of independent living senior apartments in the Midwestern United States; the focus was on factors that influence their choices, personal needs and goals, and feelings of self-direction. The mid-range self-care theory from Modeling and Role-Modeling theory (Erickson et al., 1982) framed the study. From this perspective, perceived enactment of autonomy (PEA) is the feeling that one has choices, personal knowledge of needs and goals, and control over one?s life; it is prerequisite to self-care actions that promote health and quality of life. Older adults? self-care actions to manage health processes when living with chronic illnesses and potential or actual functional declines are poorly understood. Likewise, little is known about specific factors that influence self-care actions, autonomy and quality of life from the perspective of older adults, especially the population who live independently in apartments. To address those gaps and prior to developing theory-based interventions that promote self-care via support for autonomy, interviews were conducted as part of a larger mixed method study. Respondents volunteered for the interview after completing written surveys. They were purposively selected based on age, self-rated health, and gender to obtain diverse views and until data saturation was reached. Ten women and four men aged 67 to 91 years responded to a semi-structured interview guide during a 45-minute taped interview. Traditional thematic analysis (Miles &amp; Huberman, 1994) was used to analyze data. One theme that emerged was external environmental factors as facilitators to PEA; the theme?s subcategories were physical environment, living arrangement and interpersonal environment. These findings form a foundation for designing health promotion interventions through alterations in the environment. Results also have implications for future research, theory development and public policy targeted toward the growing population of older adults.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:08:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:08:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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