2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149734
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Food Allergies in Schools
Abstract:
Food Allergies in Schools
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hoens, Cynthia Susanna, MSN, RN, C, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:South Brunswick Board of Education
Title:School Nurse
[Clinical session research presentation] During the last five years, the number of patients in the United States diagnosed with food allergies has doubled. Accounting for more than 10,000 emergency room visits annually, food anaphylaxis is quickly becoming an epidemic. Researchers have argued that because students spend a majority of their time in school, school personnel must be prepared to act. Food anaphylaxis is defined as an IgE mediated response to what the body sees as a harmful substance. About 16-20% of US families report children with food-related allergies; however the actual incidence is about 2-6%. The most common food allergens include milk, wheat, peanuts, tree-nuts, wheat, soy, fish, and shellfish. Delay in treatment is identified as the greatest factor of adverse reactions and death; therefore, early aggressive medical care is key.  Each child must have a written action plan identifying the child?s allergies, allergic triggers, emergency contact information, doctor's orders, and the actions to take if the child is exposed to the allergen.  Parents must provide Epi-Pens and Benadryl for the child. Copies of the emergency action plans should then be placed in an Epi-Pen pack so the child/designee has easy access to it throughout the day. According to the FAAN and AAAAI, schools should strongly recommend no food sharing, peanut free lunch tables, peanut-free classrooms, and careful reading of food labels. Hand-washing is critical before and after consuming food. Teachers should be strongly encouraged to limit the use of food related activities. Children with allergies should be clearly identified to everyone working in the school building along with their specific allergens. School staff must be educated in how to identify signs/symptoms promptly, as well as how to use the Epi-Pen properly. Nurses play an integral role in the process by educating families, remaining abreast of organizational recommendations, answering questions, and dispelling myths.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFood Allergies in Schoolsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149734-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Food Allergies in Schools</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hoens, Cynthia Susanna, MSN, RN, C, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Brunswick Board of Education</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">School Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cynthia.hoens@villanova.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] During the last five years, the number of patients in the United States diagnosed with food allergies has doubled. Accounting for more than 10,000 emergency room visits annually, food anaphylaxis is quickly becoming an epidemic. Researchers have argued that because students spend a majority of their time in school, school personnel must be prepared to act.&nbsp;Food anaphylaxis is defined as an IgE mediated response to what the body sees as a harmful substance.&nbsp;About 16-20% of US families report children with food-related allergies; however the actual incidence is about 2-6%.&nbsp;The most common food allergens include milk, wheat, peanuts, tree-nuts, wheat, soy, fish, and shellfish. Delay in treatment is identified as the greatest factor of adverse reactions and death; therefore, early aggressive medical care is key.&nbsp; Each child must have a written action plan identifying the child?s allergies, allergic triggers, emergency contact information, doctor's orders, and the actions to take if the child is exposed to the allergen.&nbsp; Parents must provide Epi-Pens and Benadryl for the child. Copies of the emergency action plans should then be placed in an Epi-Pen pack so the child/designee has easy access to it throughout the day. According to the FAAN and AAAAI, schools should strongly recommend no food sharing, peanut free lunch tables, peanut-free classrooms, and careful reading of food labels. Hand-washing is critical before and after consuming food. Teachers should be strongly encouraged to limit the use of food related activities.&nbsp;Children with allergies should be clearly identified to everyone working in the school building along with their specific allergens.&nbsp;School staff must be educated in how to identify signs/symptoms promptly, as well as how to use the Epi-Pen properly.&nbsp;Nurses play an integral role in the process by educating families, remaining abreast of organizational recommendations, answering questions, and dispelling myths.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:08:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:08:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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