2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149738
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Managing Testing Anxiety: A Piece of the NCLEX Puzzle
Abstract:
Managing Testing Anxiety: A Piece of the NCLEX Puzzle
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Johnson, Amy Nagorski, RNC, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Delaware
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
[Clinical session research presentation] Test anxiety is a physiologic and behavioral response students experience before and during examinations that is associated with a fear of failure.  Although the response can be improved with better study efforts, individual anxiety experiences need to be managed to improve test performance.  Strategies for reducing test-taking anxiety are numerous in the literature, yet few strategies are studied with nursing students.  The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of an exercise intervention on testing anxiety and examine the relationship of anxiety on test performance.  Design:  Quasi-experimental factorial design. Independent variable: walking intervention prior to the exam.  Dependent variable: score on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Hypothesis: There is a significant difference in test-taking anxiety between students who participate in the walking intervention before an exam and students who do not. Sample: Junior-level undergraduate nursing students. Procedure: All students were invited to participate in the study. Students self-selected control and experimental groups. 31 students power-walked on campus one hour before the first major exam.  All students (N=52) completed the 40-question State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) just prior to testing. Results: Students who completed the exercise intervention had significantly less testing anxiety than those who did not exercise (p=0.001). There were no significant differences between groups including hours reported for sleep, study, and work.  Implications: Teaching students methods to improve test-taking skills is essential to nursing education due, in part, to the licensure exam required for becoming a registered nurse. These findings support research on improving NCLEX performance and add to the body of knowledge on college testing experiences.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleManaging Testing Anxiety: A Piece of the NCLEX Puzzleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149738-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Managing Testing Anxiety: A Piece of the NCLEX Puzzle</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Amy Nagorski, RNC, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Delaware</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Ajohnson@udel.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Test anxiety is a physiologic and behavioral response students experience before and during examinations that is associated with a fear of failure.&nbsp; Although the response can be improved with better study efforts, individual anxiety experiences need to be managed to improve test performance.&nbsp; Strategies for reducing test-taking anxiety are numerous in the literature, yet few strategies are studied with nursing students.&nbsp; The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of an exercise intervention on testing anxiety and examine the relationship of anxiety on test performance.&nbsp; Design:&nbsp; Quasi-experimental factorial design.&nbsp;Independent variable: walking intervention prior to the exam.&nbsp; Dependent variable: score on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Hypothesis: There is a significant difference in test-taking anxiety between students who participate in the walking intervention before an exam and students who do not. Sample:&nbsp;Junior-level undergraduate nursing students. Procedure:&nbsp;All students were invited to participate in the study.&nbsp;Students self-selected control and experimental groups.&nbsp;31 students power-walked on campus one hour before the first major exam.&nbsp; All students (N=52) completed the 40-question State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) just prior to testing. Results:&nbsp;Students who completed the exercise intervention had significantly less testing anxiety than those who did not exercise (p=0.001).&nbsp;There were no significant differences between groups including hours reported for sleep, study, and work.&nbsp; Implications:&nbsp;Teaching students methods to improve test-taking skills is essential to nursing education due, in part, to the licensure exam required for becoming a registered nurse. These findings support research on improving NCLEX performance and add to the body of knowledge on college testing experiences.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:08:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:08:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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