Incorporating Childrens' Focus Group Data into Service Excellence Principles and Nurses' Evaluations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149739
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Incorporating Childrens' Focus Group Data into Service Excellence Principles and Nurses' Evaluations
Abstract:
Incorporating Childrens' Focus Group Data into Service Excellence Principles and Nurses' Evaluations
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Johnson, Carolyn, RN, MN, CNAA
P.I. Institution Name:Wolfson's Childrens Hospital
Title:VP Patient Care Services
Co-Authors:Melissa Faciane, RN, BSN, ACNL, CPN; Patricia Kirkland, BS, CCLS, CHES
[Leadership session research presentation] Purpose: To elicit the opinions of patients, all children, about their hospital experience. Their feedback was incorporated into the hospital's principles of service excellence and criteria for nurses' evaluations. The desired outcome was to identify children's needs, and hold nurses' accountable for meeting those needs through yearly performance evaluations. The framework for the project was "Caring Science" (Jean Watson, 2005), and patient and family centered care. Method: Videotaped children?s focus groups provided the data for change. Children from the Children's Advisory Council, with parental consent, were invited to participate. Two major questions guided the discussion: "What makes a great nurse great?" "What makes a not so great nurse?"  Results: A person experienced in conducting focus groups with children led two 30 minute sessions. Six children ages 8-17 participated; 3 in session one and 5 in session two (two children attended both sessions). A nurse leader and Child Life Coordinator observed the sessions; independently analyzed the videotape; compiled a list of answers to each question; isolated key data elements; and compared, discussed and combined results into one data set for each question. Data elements were reviewed for inclusion in the service principles and nurses' evaluations, using the children's own words whenever possible.  Examples of data elements are: Question 1: ?Makes me feel like it?s all about me." Question 2: ?Don't tell you what they are doing or what's going to happen."   Outcomes: Children's responses relevant and appropriate. Once these changes in the documents were made, results were shared with the children, who believed their opinions were adequately reflected in the revised documents. Conclusions: 1. Children's focus groups are an effective method to obtain valid data for organizational change.  2. Children were eager to give their opinions, which were both diverse and sophisticated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncorporating Childrens' Focus Group Data into Service Excellence Principles and Nurses' Evaluationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149739-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Incorporating Childrens' Focus Group Data into Service Excellence Principles and Nurses' Evaluations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Carolyn, RN, MN, CNAA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wolfson's Childrens Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">VP Patient Care Services</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Carolyn.Johnson@bmcjax.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Melissa Faciane, RN, BSN, ACNL, CPN; Patricia Kirkland, BS, CCLS, CHES</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Leadership session research presentation] Purpose: To elicit the opinions of&nbsp;patients, all children, about their hospital experience.&nbsp;Their feedback was incorporated into the hospital's principles of service excellence and criteria for nurses' evaluations. The desired outcome was to identify children's needs, and hold nurses' accountable for meeting those needs through yearly performance evaluations. The framework for the project was &quot;Caring Science&quot; (Jean Watson, 2005), and patient and family centered care. Method:&nbsp;Videotaped children?s focus groups provided the data for change. Children from the Children's Advisory Council, with parental consent, were invited to participate. Two major questions guided the discussion: &quot;What makes a great nurse great?&quot; &quot;What makes a not so great nurse?&quot;&nbsp; Results: A person experienced in conducting focus groups with children led two 30 minute sessions. Six children ages 8-17 participated; 3 in session one and 5 in session two (two children attended both sessions).&nbsp;A nurse leader and Child Life Coordinator observed the sessions; independently analyzed the videotape; compiled a list of answers to each question; isolated key data elements; and compared, discussed and combined results into one data set for each question. Data elements were reviewed for inclusion in the service principles and nurses' evaluations, using the children's own words whenever possible.&nbsp; Examples of data elements are: Question 1: ?Makes me feel like it?s all about me.&quot; Question 2: ?Don't tell you what they are doing or what's going to happen.&quot;&nbsp; &nbsp;Outcomes: Children's responses relevant and appropriate.&nbsp;Once these changes in the documents were made, results were shared with the children, who believed their opinions were adequately reflected in the revised documents. Conclusions:&nbsp;1.&nbsp;Children's focus groups are an effective method to obtain valid data for organizational change.&nbsp; 2.&nbsp;Children were eager to give their opinions, which were both diverse and sophisticated.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:08:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:08:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.